Wednesday, November 25, 2020

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Passion, Purpose, Perspective: Travis Roy dealt with tragedy by devoting his life to helping...

Published: November 1, 2020 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Life didn’t play out the way it was supposed to for Travis Roy. That didn’t stop him from making his time count.

Roy, a standout hockey player who grew up in Yarmouth, was just 11 seconds into a promising college hockey career when he crashed into the boards as a freshman at Boston University in 1995. He injured his spinal cord and was paralyized. His life changed in an instant, but he would spend the next 25 years inspiring and helping others.

A Primary Care Provider’s Guide to Autonomic Dysfunction Following Spinal Cord Injury

Published: September 15, 2020 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Spinal cord injury (SCI) disrupts the crucial “crosstalk” between the spinal autonomic nervous system and supraspinal control centers. Therefore, SCI may result not only in motor paralysis but also in potentially life-threatening impairments of many autonomic functions including, but not limited to, blood pressure regulation. Despite the detrimental consequences of autonomic dysregulation, management and recovery of autonomic functions after SCI is greatly underexplored. Although impaired autonomic function may impact several organ systems, this overview will focus primarily on disruptions of cardiovascular and thermoregulation and will offer suggestions for management of these secondary effects of SCI.

Pregnancy In Women With Spinal Cord Injuries: What To Know

Published: September 12, 2020

It is important to find a physician who understands your unique situation. Many women with SCI report this being the hardest part.

Planning to have children is an important decision that most women will make at some point in their lives. The decision is not always easy and it becomes increasingly difficult for a woman living with a disability. Fortunately, with increased awareness and support, all women can have the family they desire. Women living with spinal cord injuries (SCI) may have some unique challenges, but that does not mean that they cannot become pregnant and deliver naturally.

Craig H. Neilsen Foundation Visionary Prize: Each winner awarded $1 million

Published: September 10, 2020

The Craig H. Neilsen Foundation is thrilled to announce the creation of the Craig H. Neilsen Visionary Prize and the selection of Andrea Dalzell, Dr. Brian K. Kwon, and Reveca Torres as its inaugural recipients. Each prize winner is awarded $1 million, respectively.

The Paralyzed World War II Veterans Who Invented Wheelchair Basketball

Published: September 2, 2020

In the late 1940s, paraplegics popularized the sport—and changed the game for the disability rights movement

On an unremarkable Wednesday evening in the spring of 1948, 15,561 spectators flocked to New York’s Madison Square Garden to watch two teams of World War II veterans play an exhibition basketball game.

Neuralink Reveals Working Brain-to-Machine Interface

Published: September 1, 2020

NeuralinkIn a live demonstration, Elon Musk revealed that Neuralink has successfully installed a working brain-to-machine interface inside a pig.

Elon Musk’s brain-hacking company Neuralink demonstrated a working brain-to-machine interface in a live demonstration on August 28th.

Patients with spinal cord injury warned of higher risk from virus

Published: June 10, 2020

Noting that the patients of spinal cord injury are at a higher risk of contracting Covid-19 virus, Indian Spinal Injuries Centre (ISIC), a premier super specialty hospital in the city, has urged the patients to keep themselves in isolation to avoid getting infected of Coronavirus as their bodies cannot respond to bacteria and viruses like a normal person can.

Dr HS Chhabra, Medical Director of Indian Spinal Injuries Centre said that immunosuppression, the body’s response to bacteria and viruses, is the main concern.

COVID‐19 and Spinal Cord Injuries: The viewpoint from an emergency department resident with quadriplegia

Published: April 19, 2020 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) present distinct physiological and social considerations for the emergency physician. During the COVID‐19 pandemic, these considerations may generate unique challenges for emergency physicians managing patients with SCIs. Physiological disruptions may alter the way SCI patients present with COVID‐19. The same disruptions can affect management of this vulnerable patient group, perhaps warranting early aggressive treatment. The medical picture will often be complicated by unique social characteristics. The reliance on caregivers for activities of daily living can, as an example, increase the human resource requirement of an ED. Considering the vulnerabilities and complexities of patients with SCI, the community should prioritise prevention of COVID‐19 infections in this group. In the event that they do present to an ED, planning for and understanding their complexities will facilitate optimal management.

When you can’t cough ― extra COVID-19 precautions for people with physical disabilities

Published: April 14, 2020

Mayo Clinic – ROCHESTER, Minn. — People with conditions such as spinal cord injury, Lou Gehrig’s disease and multiple sclerosis are at risk of developing severe respiratory problems related to COVID-19 because the muscles that help them breathe already may not function normally.

“When you have a condition that causes paralysis, or weakens muscles in the chest, abdomen or diaphragm, you may not be able to remove lung secretions by coughing,” says Kristin Garlanger, D.O., a Mayo Clinic physiatrist. “You may have difficulty inhaling and filling the lungs with oxygen that is carried to the rest of the body.

What is Autonomic Dysreflexia and how does it affect spinal cord injury?

Published: February 20, 2020 | Spinal Cord Injury:

This is an informative video about Autonomic Dysreflexia (AD) which is a condition that affects anyone who has a spinal cord injury T6 level and above.