Monday, July 6, 2020

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Patients with spinal cord injury warned of higher risk from virus

Published: June 10, 2020

Noting that the patients of spinal cord injury are at a higher risk of contracting Covid-19 virus, Indian Spinal Injuries Centre (ISIC), a premier super specialty hospital in the city, has urged the patients to keep themselves in isolation to avoid getting infected of Coronavirus as their bodies cannot respond to bacteria and viruses like a normal person can.

Dr HS Chhabra, Medical Director of Indian Spinal Injuries Centre said that immunosuppression, the body’s response to bacteria and viruses, is the main concern.

COVID‐19 and Spinal Cord Injuries: The viewpoint from an emergency department resident with quadriplegia

Published: April 19, 2020 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) present distinct physiological and social considerations for the emergency physician. During the COVID‐19 pandemic, these considerations may generate unique challenges for emergency physicians managing patients with SCIs. Physiological disruptions may alter the way SCI patients present with COVID‐19. The same disruptions can affect management of this vulnerable patient group, perhaps warranting early aggressive treatment. The medical picture will often be complicated by unique social characteristics. The reliance on caregivers for activities of daily living can, as an example, increase the human resource requirement of an ED. Considering the vulnerabilities and complexities of patients with SCI, the community should prioritise prevention of COVID‐19 infections in this group. In the event that they do present to an ED, planning for and understanding their complexities will facilitate optimal management.

When you can’t cough ― extra COVID-19 precautions for people with physical disabilities

Published: April 14, 2020

Mayo Clinic – ROCHESTER, Minn. — People with conditions such as spinal cord injury, Lou Gehrig’s disease and multiple sclerosis are at risk of developing severe respiratory problems related to COVID-19 because the muscles that help them breathe already may not function normally.

“When you have a condition that causes paralysis, or weakens muscles in the chest, abdomen or diaphragm, you may not be able to remove lung secretions by coughing,” says Kristin Garlanger, D.O., a Mayo Clinic physiatrist. “You may have difficulty inhaling and filling the lungs with oxygen that is carried to the rest of the body.

What is Autonomic Dysreflexia and how does it affect spinal cord injury?

Published: February 20, 2020 | Spinal Cord Injury:

This is an informative video about Autonomic Dysreflexia (AD) which is a condition that affects anyone who has a spinal cord injury T6 level and above.

Stem cells a step toward improving motor, sensory function after spinal cord injury

Published: November 27, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Early research at Mayo Clinic using stem cell therapy to treat spinal cord injuries has produced results for one patient that doctors describe as “beyond expectations.”

Logitech’s Adaptive Gaming Kit Makes the Xbox Adaptive Controller More Accessible

Published: November 18, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Microsoft’s Xbox Adaptive Controller (XAC) facilitates gaming for players with accessibility needs. While a forward-thinking device, the XAC isn’t without limitations. To get the most out of the peripheral, users must purchase separate triggers, switches, and other accessories. Doing this can get expensive, especially for those living on a limited budget. Logitech has a solution with its upcoming product: the Logitech G Adaptive Gaming Kit. I recently participated in a conference call where I got to see what the Adaptive Gaming Kit is all about.

Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation to Partner with Craig Hospital for New Video Series

Published: November 1, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Christopher & Dana Reeve FoundationSHORT HILLS, N.J., Nov. 1, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation has partnered with Craig Hospital to introduce a new health series called Adaptive Tools for Independence.  The video series highlights functional tools and adaptive equipment that is available to assist individuals living with paralysis or limited hand functions to gain more independence in their day to day activities.  Daily tasks such as cooking, and bowel and bladder care are included in the first set of videos in the series. Other tasks like housekeeping, dressing, hair, and makeup will be available in the next installment. These videos aim to show how all these tasks can become much easier and be done with little or no assistance. Most of the tools featured in the videos are available online or can be crafted at home.

The new Gods of esports are paralyzed from the neck down

Published: October 14, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Players with quadriplegia are using neuroscience and video games to take on the world.

On a mostly sunny July afternoon in 2014, Chris Scott jumped out of a plane. For Scott, a thrill-seeking instructor at Skydive Long Island in New York, this wasn’t unusual. It wasn’t out of the norm for jumping partner Gary Messina, either. Known to friends as “Gary Go Hard,” the New York City corrections officer had been dropping out of planes since his teens.

Kansas man creating custom Halloween costumes for kids in wheelchairs

Published: October 11, 2019

OLATHE, Kan. (KAKE) -A Kansas nonprofit is again going above and beyond for kids in wheelchairs this Halloween by creating custom costumes.WDAF reports Walkin’ and Rollin’s over-the-top designs stop people in their tracks. One of their latest was for an 11-year-old Kansas City Chiefs fan from Eudora.

John Pittman now gets to cheer on his favorite team in his Arrowhead Stadium Halloween costume.

Teacher carries student with spina bifida on back so she can enjoy field trip

Published: September 25, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

10-year-old Ryan King has spina bifida, and when field trips are not wheelchair accessible, she has to miss out. But on a recent trip for school, Ryan got to join in on the fun – because a teacher volunteered to carry her the whole way.