Monday, December 9, 2019

Daily Archives: August 17, 2005

HELPING HANDS

Published: August 17, 2005

HELPING HANDS is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for quadriplegic individuals by training capuchin monkeys to assist them with daily activities. It’s difficult to imagine what it would be like to be a quadriplegic. Yet in a split second, it could happen to anyone. And when it does, people lose more than control of their arms and legs -they lose control of their lives. Each day becomes a challenge to regain that control and as much independence as possible. Our monkeys are affectionate, responsive friends whose companionship can brighten a disabled individual’s outlook on life, relieve hours of loneliness and help him become more independent.

Men’s Wheelchair basketball

Published: August 17, 2005

You’ve been injured a while, but for one reason or another you have to change doctors. Perhaps you’ve moved, your doctor has retired, you’re in a new health plan and you need to change doctors, or you’re not convinced that your doctor is doing the best for you. You need a doctor who has had some history with or interest in SCI or related conditions.

Changing or Choosing Your Doctor

Published: August 17, 2005

Many medical doctors, particularly general practitioners, family practitioners, or internists, see relatively few people with spinal cord injuries. They may not be aware of its complications or its impact on aging. Therefore, you, as an SCI survivor, need to learn what you can about your current condition so you can inform your doctor of your specific needs. The field of medicine is so broad that it is impossible for any physician to be an expert on everything. Moreover, information about SCI is expanding enormously. Forty years ago there were few survivors. Now there are thousands, and we are learning something new every day.

Interacting With Your Doctor

Published: August 17, 2005

As part of a growing health and cost conscious public, we now take more responsibility for our health. More concerned about what we eat, drink and how we exercise, we also bring a questioning approach to health care. We are now forging new relationships with our doctors and we are less likely to sit passively and accept unquestioningly our doctor’s directions. We want second opinions, alternative treatments or medications.


As a person with SCI, you know you will spend more time with doctors and other health care professionals than most people. It is a good idea to know your rights and responsibilities as a patient as well as your doctors rights and responsibilities.

The Medicare Maze

Published: August 17, 2005

If you are newly injured and need information about Disability benefits, or if you’re approaching age 65, and looking at retirement, then it might be time to check out Medicare and its many options.

What is Medicare?
Medicare is a federal health insurance program for persons who are disabled and have received Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) for at least 24 months, and for persons 65 years of age or older. Medicare has two parts:

Part A covers inpatient hospitalization, skilled nursing facility care, and hospice care. It covers all but the first three pints of blood per year. Medicare will also pay for some home health care services. However, to get these services you must need skilled care and you must be homebound.

You And Your Doctor: Rights and Responsibilities

Published: August 17, 2005

Everywhere you look these days there is health information – in Readers Digest, in Good Housekeeping, in Men’s Health, in the magazine that comes with the Sunday newspaper, even in those sleazy newspapers you see in the grocery store checkout line. Even radio and TV commercials have celebrities talking about “studies at leading universities” as they show you data and diagrams telling how each new over-the-counter medicine works.

Places like these are where you’re liable to hear stories like, “caffeine causes bladder cancer.” Or, “new drug to cure spinal cord injury discovered.” When you hear stories like these, you should:

Finding the Information You Need

Published: August 17, 2005

Everywhere you look these days there is health information – in Readers Digest, in Good Housekeeping, in Men’s Health, in the magazine that comes with the Sunday newspaper, even in those sleazy newspapers you see in the grocery store checkout line. Even radio and TV commercials have celebrities talking about “studies at leading universities” as they show you data and diagrams telling how each new over-the-counter medicine works.

Places like these are where you’re liable to hear stories like, “caffeine causes bladder cancer.” Or, “new drug to cure spinal cord injury discovered.” When you hear stories like these, you should:

Understanding Those Medical & Research Articles

Published: August 17, 2005

Ever have trouble making sense out of articles in medical, scientific, and research magazines? This brochure will give you some pointers as you try to wade through all the techno-jargon you find!

There’s Hope in Consistency
You need some strategies to make reading medical and scientific journals easier. Luckily, scientific articles in magazines – like the Journal of the American Medical Association, Spinal Cord, or Neurology – tend to be divided into sections with headings like

Those Scary Statistics

Published: August 17, 2005

Most authors who publish research articles use statistics to make their conclusions. Hold on to your seats! Statistics have a way of losing even the best of readers. What we’ll try to do here is give you a very simple, streamlined understanding of statistics.

In general, statistics are used to describe something or to examine differences among groups or relationships among characteristics. Statisticians will use terms like mean, median, and standard deviation.

Home Alone!

Published: August 17, 2005

Many people think of “independence” not in terms of how well they can dress themselves, transfer into bed, or drive, but in terms of their ability to live alone in their own home. Many of these people use hired helpers, or assistants who come into the home, do what needs to be done, and then leave. Such helpers, rather than spelling dependence, are in fact a tool for the individual’s independence.

Is this “life on the edge?” Many would say so. And it’s true: many disabled people who live on their own are playing “beat the odds,” hoping that nothing happens while they’re alone.

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