Monday, July 6, 2020

Daily Archives: October 6, 2008

Protein shown to play a key role in normal development of nervous system

Published: October 6, 2008

Findings may someday inform treatments for spinal cord, other nerve injuries

A protein that enables nerve cells to communicate with each other plays a key role in controlling the developing nervous system. Research into how that protein helps precise connections to form among nerve cells may provide a basis for eventual treatments for patients who suffer injuries to their nervous system, including spinal cord injury.

Grand Lake teen readjusts to life at home after nearly fatal car accident

Published: October 6, 2008

zack-bigAs he was growing up in Grand Lake, everybody knew Zack Peterson as the kid with the big smile and the tousled blond hair who was a good athlete and a great guy.

When you meet him today, he’s still all of those things with one addition. He’s now in a wheelchair.

Zack, who graduated from Middle Park High School in May, was involved in a single-car accident just after midnight on Sunday, July 13. He fell asleep behind the wheel while returning from a trip to Denver and crashed on U.S. Highway 34, a few miles short of his home.

Robot suit for rent in Japan to help people walk

Published: October 6, 2008

TSUKUBA, Japan – A robotic suit that reads brain signals and helps people with mobility problems will be available to rent in Japan for US$2,200 a month starting Friday – an invention that may have far-reaching benefits for the disabled and elderly.

HAL – short for “hybrid assistive limb” – is a computerized suit with sensors that read brain signals directing limb movement through the skin.

The 22 pound (10 kilogram) battery-operated computer system is belted to the waist. It captures the brain signals and relays them to mechanical leg braces strapped to the thighs and knees, which then provide robotic assistance to people as they walk.

CNN Show with Professir X and NSCIA Santina Muha

Published: October 6, 2008

CNN Show with Professir X and NSCIA Santina Muha