Sunday, August 18, 2019

Monthly Archives: August 2005

Hurricane Relief for People with Disabilities

Published: August 31, 2005

The Centers for Independent Living in Biloxi, Mississippi and New Orleans were severely impacted by the hurricane. In fact the Biloxi, MS center was totally destroyed. Many of you are asking how you can help. Here is what we have learned from colleagues in those states.

Sending money is the first priority. Sending supplies to those centers is helpful too but NOT RIGHT NOW, because they can’t get through the water.

Whats leading cause of death?

Published: August 22, 2005

In years past, the leading cause of death among persons with SCI was renal failure. Today, however, significant advances in urologic management have resulted in dramatic shifts in the leading causes of death. Persons enrolled in the National SCI Database since its inception in 1973 have now been followed for 27 years after injury.

During that time, the causes of death that appear to have the greatest impact on reduced life expectancy for this population are pneumonia, pulmonary emboli and septicemia.

What is a Stem Cell?

Published: August 18, 2005

All mammals begin as two cells — sperm and egg — that combine into a single cell. This single cell will divide exponentially into specialized cells making up various organs and systems — all the tissues of a new organism.

Simply put, a stem cell is an immature cell that can become a different cell, or perhaps become one of many different cells.

Most stem cells also can renew themselves — divide — indefinitely. These two characteristics are what present a new pathway to repairing damage to the human body caused by trauma, degeneration and disease.

HELPING HANDS

Published: August 17, 2005

HELPING HANDS is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for quadriplegic individuals by training capuchin monkeys to assist them with daily activities. It’s difficult to imagine what it would be like to be a quadriplegic. Yet in a split second, it could happen to anyone. And when it does, people lose more than control of their arms and legs -they lose control of their lives. Each day becomes a challenge to regain that control and as much independence as possible. Our monkeys are affectionate, responsive friends whose companionship can brighten a disabled individual’s outlook on life, relieve hours of loneliness and help him become more independent.

Men’s Wheelchair basketball

Published: August 17, 2005

You’ve been injured a while, but for one reason or another you have to change doctors. Perhaps you’ve moved, your doctor has retired, you’re in a new health plan and you need to change doctors, or you’re not convinced that your doctor is doing the best for you. You need a doctor who has had some history with or interest in SCI or related conditions.

Changing or Choosing Your Doctor

Published: August 17, 2005

Many medical doctors, particularly general practitioners, family practitioners, or internists, see relatively few people with spinal cord injuries. They may not be aware of its complications or its impact on aging. Therefore, you, as an SCI survivor, need to learn what you can about your current condition so you can inform your doctor of your specific needs. The field of medicine is so broad that it is impossible for any physician to be an expert on everything. Moreover, information about SCI is expanding enormously. Forty years ago there were few survivors. Now there are thousands, and we are learning something new every day.

Interacting With Your Doctor

Published: August 17, 2005

As part of a growing health and cost conscious public, we now take more responsibility for our health. More concerned about what we eat, drink and how we exercise, we also bring a questioning approach to health care. We are now forging new relationships with our doctors and we are less likely to sit passively and accept unquestioningly our doctor’s directions. We want second opinions, alternative treatments or medications.


As a person with SCI, you know you will spend more time with doctors and other health care professionals than most people. It is a good idea to know your rights and responsibilities as a patient as well as your doctors rights and responsibilities.

The Medicare Maze

Published: August 17, 2005

If you are newly injured and need information about Disability benefits, or if you’re approaching age 65, and looking at retirement, then it might be time to check out Medicare and its many options.

What is Medicare?
Medicare is a federal health insurance program for persons who are disabled and have received Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) for at least 24 months, and for persons 65 years of age or older. Medicare has two parts:

Part A covers inpatient hospitalization, skilled nursing facility care, and hospice care. It covers all but the first three pints of blood per year. Medicare will also pay for some home health care services. However, to get these services you must need skilled care and you must be homebound.

You And Your Doctor: Rights and Responsibilities

Published: August 17, 2005

Everywhere you look these days there is health information – in Readers Digest, in Good Housekeeping, in Men’s Health, in the magazine that comes with the Sunday newspaper, even in those sleazy newspapers you see in the grocery store checkout line. Even radio and TV commercials have celebrities talking about “studies at leading universities” as they show you data and diagrams telling how each new over-the-counter medicine works.

Places like these are where you’re liable to hear stories like, “caffeine causes bladder cancer.” Or, “new drug to cure spinal cord injury discovered.” When you hear stories like these, you should:

Finding the Information You Need

Published: August 17, 2005

Everywhere you look these days there is health information – in Readers Digest, in Good Housekeeping, in Men’s Health, in the magazine that comes with the Sunday newspaper, even in those sleazy newspapers you see in the grocery store checkout line. Even radio and TV commercials have celebrities talking about “studies at leading universities” as they show you data and diagrams telling how each new over-the-counter medicine works.

Places like these are where you’re liable to hear stories like, “caffeine causes bladder cancer.” Or, “new drug to cure spinal cord injury discovered.” When you hear stories like these, you should:

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!