Tuesday, August 11, 2020

Answers

Answers to frequently asked Questions about Spinal Cord Injury

What is Autonomic Dysreflexia and how does it affect spinal cord injury?

Published: February 20, 2020 | Spinal Cord Injury:

This is an informative video about Autonomic Dysreflexia (AD) which is a condition that affects anyone who has a spinal cord injury T6 level and above.

Can an Active Lifestyle Improve Recovery After a Spinal Cord Injury?

Published: January 23, 2020

Permanent neurological impairments can occur after spinal cord injury (SCI) due to the failure of the spinal cord motor and sensory axons to regenerate.

This is because the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), unlike in some amphibians and reptiles, has inhibitory molecules blocking growth post-development, as well as the lack of an effective regenerative response system. Within the peripheral nervous system (PNS), there is some limited axonal recovery that can occur naturally.

Quadriplegics Answer Web’s Most Searched Questions on Paralysis

Published: January 9, 2020 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Jenny and Abby answer some of the webs most asked questions for people living with paralysis (specifically quadriplegia)!

How can employers support workers with spinal injuries?

Published: November 21, 2019

There has been slow progress in getting more disabled people into work, and those with spinal cord injuries have a particularly low employment rate. What can employers do to support them back to work, asks Alex Dabek?

In 2017, the government announced plans aimed to get one million more disabled people in work over the next 10 years after it emerged less than half working age people with disabilities (49.2%) were in employment in June 2017.

How to cope with your spinal cord injury – 8 tips for newly injured...

Published: May 15, 2019

8 do’s and don’t s on how to cope with your new spinal cord injury.

Should I say ‘disabled person’ or ‘person with a disability’?⁠

Published: April 11, 2019

Recently, an Alberta woman with an obvious physical disability was asked to leave a grocery store and not come back because she could not pack her own groceries quickly enough. According to the report on CBC’s Go Public, the checkout clerk said she was slowing down the line as she struggled to bag her groceries, and the store said no staff were available to help her. Presumably, neither were other patrons.

This story is consistent with what many disabled people say they experience. The Human Rights Commission says that almost 60 per cent of all claims cite disability as the basis for discrimination. People with disabilities are routinely denied the rights we all know they are entitled to.

Can nanotechnology rewire an injured spinal cord?

Published: January 21, 2019

According to the World Health Organisation, up to a half-million people around the world suffer a spinal cord injury each year. Often caused by road traffic crashes, accidents or violence, the loss of motor control or paralysis significantly impacts quality of life and requires years of treatment and care. Spinal cord injury is also associated with lower rates of school enrollment and economic participation, and carries substantial individual and societal costs.

Current methods for spinal cord injury treatment involve cumbersome brain-machine interfaces, with many cables linking the patient and a computer to restore limited motor functions.

Could nose cells treat spinal cord injuries?

Published: August 13, 2018

Scientists developing robust method to treat spinal cord injuries using nose cells

Researchers have designed a new way to grow nose cells in the lab heralding hope for sufferers of spinal cord injuries, including those who are wheelchair bound.

Griffith University’s Mr Mo Chen grew nose nerve cells in the lab, which can treat mice with spinal cord injuries.

What is life like with a spinal cord injury?

Published: November 18, 2017

Having a spinal cord injury changes some things forever, but you can still have a full and rewarding life. A saying among people who have a spinal cord injury is, “Before your injury, you could do 10,000 things. Now you can do 9,000. So are you going to worry about the 1,000 things you can’t do or focus on the 9,000 things you can do?”

After they adjust, many people with spinal cord injuries are able to work, drive, play sports, and have relationships and families. Your rehab team can provide the support, training, and resources to help you move toward new goals. It’s up to you to make the most of what they have to offer.

Question Time with Jai (Spinal Cord Injury)

Published: October 5, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Jai’s life nearly ended after a dip in the ocean resulted in a high-level spinal injury. He explains how he’s carved out a great life for himself and why he has no use for pick-up lines.