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Spinal Cord Injury News

Spinal Cord Injury News Articles

Paralyzed Vermont woman receives hundreds of Valentine’s Day cards to decorate hospital room

Published: February 13, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

COLCHESTER, Vt. — There’s a patient wing at Fanny Allen in Colchester that’s filled with a whole lot of love.

“I’ve gotten cards from all over the place (like) New Mexico, Colorado, Florida, California, Washington state, Oregon, all of New England,” said Sara Conchieri. Continue Reading »

Spinal cord injuries can’t keep three Arkansans from living

Published: February 12, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Jen Goodwin did everything she was supposed to do — she graduated from college, bought her first house and accepted her dream job in Little Rock. Then in 2008 she decided to spend a June day on Lake Hamilton with her neighbor.

The two were boating around the lake, looking at the lights bouncing off the surface when he, standing on the edge of the boat, fell.

His head slammed onto the back of her neck, and she immediately knew that something was off. Continue Reading »

Paralyzed in 2014 crash that killed her beloved husband, Robinette Tilley stays in family business

Published: February 10, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Robinette Tilley is the boss. The fact that she rides a wheelchair now instead of a motorcycle hasn’t changed that.

Tilley was in her customary spot, sitting behind her husband, Don, on his Harley-Davidson when the motorcycle crashed on Aug. 29, 2014 near Mile Post 394 on the Blue Ridge Parkway in Buncombe County. Don, 78, was killed in the wreck.

A shattered right arm, broken neck and pelvis, and seriously damaged spinal cord sent Robinette to six different hospitals in six months. Doctors told Tilley’s family she would never return home. Continue Reading »

Adult Stem Cells Treat Spinal Cord Injury

Published: February 5, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Laura Dominguez-Tauer is a living, breathing example of what it takes to overcome adversity. An oil spill on a San Antonio freeway is blamed for the car crash that sent Laura and her brother directly into a retaining wall in 2001. As she lay tangled in the middle of the car, she heard a paramedic say, “get a neck brace, she has a broken neck.”

“I didn’t feel anything. I couldn’t move my arms, I couldn’t move my hands,”

Laura was paralyzed from the neck down. “I didn’t feel anything. I couldn’t move my arms, I couldn’t move my hands,” Laura said. Continue Reading »

UofL researchers report activity-based training improves urinary function after spinal cord injury

Published: February 1, 2018

Activity-based training has resulted in unexpected benefits for individuals with severe spinal cord injury. Researchers in the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center at the University of Louisville have discovered that the training, designed to help individuals with SCI improve motor function, also leads to improved bladder and bowel function and increased sexual desire.

Research participants receiving activity-based training conducted by KSCIRC at Frazier Rehab Institute initially reported improvements in bladder, bowel and sexual function anecdotally. Charles Hubscher, PhD, professor and researcher at KSCIRC, has documented those changes in research published today in the journal PLOS ONE. Continue Reading »

Half of spinal cord injury patients may still have some connectivity, Australian study finds

Published: January 31, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

The sensation James Stanley misses most is the squidgey feeling of wet sand between his toes. Sometimes it’s dangling his legs into cool water, and the feeling of soft grass under his feet.

“They’re very simple things, but when you haven’t felt them for seven years I just think it would be amazing to feel them again,” the 25-year-old said.

A rare surfing injury called surfer’s myelopathy paralysed Mr Stanley from the navel down when he was 19 years old. As he pushed up on his surfboard his spine hyper-extended, triggering a swelling and spinal cord blockage at his T10 vertebra. Continue Reading »

Disabled TV Host’s Speech ‘Why Am I Still Alive’ Which Has Inspired Millions Despite Growing Controversy

Published: January 24, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

You might have come across her inspirational speech being shared online, in which she talked about how her husband jumped out of the car and saved himself while she survived with grave injuries in a horrific car accident.

The story she tells is compelling and moving, with over a 100 million viewers and counting as people all over the world responded to her inspiring message of overcoming the odds despite immense obstacles that life has dealt her.

Often referred to as Pakistan’s Iron Lady, Muniba Mazari’s amazing story about her journey back from massive spinal injuries that left her bedridden for two years is incredibly moving, so much so that she has found international acclaim as a TV host and United Nations goodwill ambassador. Continue Reading »

Brett Colonell: An Artist in Training

Published: January 24, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

When Brett Colonell took up sketching as a hobby years ago, he didn’t know yet how it would one day evolve into an integral part of his life. Even now, as he explores art as a fulltime profession, he still refers to himself as an artist in training, despite the significant audience his art has drawn on social media.

What many of his fans don’t know is that in 1997 Brett sustained a complete C4-C5 spinal fracture after a motocross accident, leaving him a quadriplegic with no movement from the neck down. After his spinal cord injury, he completed his rehabilitation at Craig Hospital. Continue Reading »

People with tetraplegia gain rapid use of brain-computer interface

Published: January 24, 2018

For a brain-computer interface (BCI) to be truly useful for a person with tetraplegia, it should be ready whenever it’s needed, with minimal expert intervention, including the very first time it’s used. In a new study in the Journal of Neural Engineering, researchers in the BrainGate collaboration demonstrate new techniques that allowed three participants to achieve peak BCI performance within three minutes of engaging in an easy, one-step process.

One participant, “T5,” a 63-year-old man who had never used a BCI before, needed only 37 seconds of calibration time before he could control a computer cursor to reach targets on a screen, just by imagining using his hand to move a joystick. Continue Reading »

This hand exoskeleton for people with paralysis can be controlled by brainwaves

Published: January 23, 2018

People with limited mobility or paralysis could be able to use their hands again thanks to a robotic exoskeleton which can be controlled by brainwaves.

The lightweight and portable devices are being developed in the Geneva lab of Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) and can restore functional grasps for those with physical impairments.

It is hoped that refined versions of the kit will allow people to complete meaningful daily tasks. Continue Reading »