Sunday, September 27, 2020

Monthly Archives: July 2020

Paralyzed man has sense of touch restored by brain-machine interface

Published: July 29, 2020 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

This is the first BMI to restore movement and touch simultaneously

Ten years ago, while on vacation in North Carolina, Ian Burkhart broke his neck in a diving accident. The diagnosis was as life-changing as the injury: a complete spinal cord injury in the cervical spine. An injury of this nature often results in paraplegia. Burkhart might regain some movement and sensation in his shoulders and upper arm, doctors said. But the chances of ever moving his hands again were slim.

Mouse study shows spinal cord injury causes bone marrow failure syndrome

Published: July 24, 2020

Research conducted at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Medicine found that spinal cord injuries in mice cause an acquired bone marrow failure syndrome that may contribute to chronic immune dysfunction.

“We also found that it’s possible to overcome certain aspects of spinal cord injury-induced bone marrow failure.

Clonus After Spinal Cord Injury: How to Minimize Involuntary Shaking

Published: July 16, 2020

After a spinal cord injury, you may experience involuntary, rhythmic shaking called clonus.

To help you better understand clonus after spinal cord injury, this article will go over its causes, symptoms, and management.

Emergency Department Dr with a wheelchair

Published: July 11, 2020 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Dinesh Palipana was a young medical student with a promising career ahead of him, when a car accident left him with C6/7 spinal cord injury and facing life with tetraplegia.

Home Exercises for Spinal Cord Injury

Published: July 9, 2020

Exercise is essential after a spinal cord injury.

Quad Life Podcast

Published: July 6, 2020

Quad Life brings you the daily realities of life with a spinal cord injury. Featuring stories that are often difficult, sometimes funny and always honest. Our episodes offer a window in the nuanced lives of people with quadriplegia as they age and the people around them.