Thursday, April 2, 2020

Tag: Anatomy

Race to Human Stem-Cell Trials

Published: April 18, 2005

SAN DIEGO — Several scientists have used embryonic or fetal stem cells to help rodents with spinal cord injuries walk again. The researchers travel the country showing videos of rats dragging their hind legs, followed by clips of them miraculously hopping around following stem-cell injections.

What does the spinal cord look like and what does it do?

Published: September 15, 2004

spinal_cord_cut-away The cord in humans may be likened to a coaxial cable, about one inch in diameter, and is a continuation of the brain.

It looks like firm, white fat; nerves extend out from the cord to the muscles, skin and bones, to control movement, receive sensations and regulate bodily excretions and secretions.

The 31 pairs of spinal nerves divide the cord into the following segments: 8 cervical, 12 thoracic, 5 lumbar, 5 sacral, and 1 coccygeal.

Glimmers of hope as scientists continue their search for the ‘next big thing’

Published: May 14, 2004

Are stem cells the holy grail for medical research?
Donna Chisholm reports on the scientific advances that might help in the battle against disease.

If Dr Frankenstein were trying to create the fiend this century, he wouldn’t bother robbing graves – he’d surely try stem cells.

New findings on nerve cell proteins show promise for reducing disability

Published: March 17, 2004

New findings in animals suggest a potential treatment to minimize Disability after spinal cord and other nervous system injuries, say neuroscientists from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

“Our approach is based on a natural mechanism cells have for protecting themselves, called the stress protein response,” said Michael Tytell, Ph.D., a neuroscientist and the study’s lead researcher. “We believe it has potential for preventing some of the disability that occurs as a result of nervous system trauma and disease.”

Findings on Nerve Cell Proteins Show Promise for Reducing Disability

Published: March 10, 2004

New findings in animals suggest a potential treatment to minimize Disability after spinal cord and other nervous system injuries, say neuroscientists.

Newswise — New findings in animals suggest a potential treatment to minimize disability after spinal cord and other nervous system injuries, say neuroscientists from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

Basic Anatomy

Published: February 2, 2004

Together, the brain and spinal cord make up the Central Nervous System. They are covered by three layers of membranes called meninges and bathed in protective Cerebrospinal Fluid, which acts as a “shock absorber” to help prevent injury.

The largest part of the brain is comprised of the cerebrum, which is split into right and left hemispheres. The cerebrum controls voluntary actions, thought, speech, and memory. Most mammals have a relatively small cerebrum, but in humans it makes up most of the brain. This allows us to perform much more complicated actions than other species can.

Pediatric cervical spine injuries: avoiding potential disaster.

Published: January 4, 2004

Although Cervical spine injuries (CSIs) are uncommon in children, a missed or delayed diagnosis may have devastating consequences for the patient. A thorough understanding of normal pediatric anatomy, injury patterns, and children who are at increased risk for injury is critical for the physician caring for the acutely injured child. The author provides an overview of the unique features of the pediatric spine, and fracture patterns that occur commonly in children. The author also offers guidelines on instances when a child is at increased risk for sustaining a CSI.

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