Saturday, August 15, 2020

Tag: Family and Friends

First-ever guidelines for spinal cord injuries.

Published: October 9, 2002

How spinal cord injuries (SCI) are managed–especially in the critical early stages–has a profound effect on a patient’s outcome. The publication of the first comprehensive SCI, treatment guidelines is an important step in standardizing evidence-based care.

Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) causes devastating neurologic Impairment that often leads to a lifetime of Disability. Each year, there are approximately 11,000 new SCI cases in the United States. (1) About 55% of SCIs occur among people between the ages of 16 and 30. (1)

Rover in Rehab

Published: April 17, 2002

Therapy dogs work with SCI patients at University of Washington and Harborview Medical Centers

Animal lovers know how comforting a pet can be. Health care providers now recognize that the unconditional love and companionship of a pet can have beneficial effects on the physical and psychological health of the people around them. Increasingly, therapy animals are being used in nursing homes, hospitals, and other therapeutic settings to encourage social interaction and reduce loneliness. At Harborview and the University of Washington Medical Center, therapy dogs have become regular members of the Rehabilitation staff.

Dip-Stick Testing for Urinary Tract Infections

Published: November 8, 2001

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common problem for persons with spinal cord injury. Signs and symptoms of UTI may include cloudy urine, increased Spasticity, fever, chills, and urinary frequency and Incontinence.

Sometimes the signs and symptoms are subtle, and your doctor may order a urinalysis, which usually includes dip-stick testing, a method to detect the presence of nitrites and/or leukocyte esterase. Nitrate is normally present in the urine and is changed into nitrite in the presence of certain bacteria, usually those belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae family. Leukocycte esterase is an enzyme that indicates the presence of white blood cells in the urine.

Life Satisfaction Among Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: July 12, 2000

Every year, approximately 10,000 persons in the United States, typically young adults (New Mobility, 1996), seriously injure their spinal cords and become permanently paralyzed. Through advances in medical treatment, most persons survive a spinal cord injury and live two or more decades post-injury. However, researchers have only recently begun to study the long-term psychosocial implications of a spinal cord injury (Whiteneck, Charlifue, Frankel, et al., 1992). One such psychosocial implication is the person’s perceived satisfaction with the quality of his or her life following such an injury. This study examined factors associated with the life satisfaction of persons with a spinal cord injury including biological, personal, and social factors.

Sexual problems of disabled patients

Published: March 20, 2000

ABC of sexual health
Almost 4% of the UK population have some form of physical, sensory, or intellectual Impairment–almost 2.5 million people. Many of these disabling conditions can produce sexual problems of desire, arousal, orgasm, or sexual pain in men and women. Sexual difficulties may arise from direct trauma to the genital area (due to either accident or disease), damage to the nervous system (such as spinal cord injury), or as an indirect consequence of a non-sexual illness (cancer of any organ may not directly affect sexual abilities but can cause fatigue and reduce the desire or ability to engage in sexual activity).

A Comparison Between People with Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: February 16, 2000

Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a severe traumatic Disability that occurs suddenly and affects both sensory and Motor functions. According to the National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center 1999), there are about 203,000 persons in the U.S. who have sustained a spinal cord injury and approximately 10,000 new injuries occurr each year. Although medical advances have increased the life expectancies of people with SCI, there has been a limited amount of research addressing life satisfaction in people with SCI (Krause, 1992).

To Walk Again or Not Walk Again

Published: January 18, 2000

I was listening to a tape on the Internet at Greg Smith’s On-A-Roll Talk Radio on Life and Disability (excellent site by the way). At first, I was surprised at the diversion in the disability community over Christopher Reeves’ activities to focus on research for recovery from his spinal cord injury. Then it made me angry.

What is the criticism about of Christopher Reeves? We all have gifts. We all can do something no one else can. I don’t want somebody undermining my efforts because I don’t understand completely what someone else is going through.