Friday, September 20, 2019

Tag: probiotic

Probiotics and Spinal Cord Injury

Published: July 23, 2019

We often hear that probiotics are good bacteria—but why? What makes certain bacteria “good” or “bad”? And does taking a daily dose of probiotics really help us?

Spinal Injuries Impact Gut Microbiome

Published: December 2, 2016

spinal-injuries-impact-gut-microbiomeThe gut microbiome undergoes changes after a patient suffers a spinal cord injury, according to a new study.

Researchers from The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center used mice models of spinal cord injury in order to determine whether gut bacteria dysbiosis – or, functional interruption – affects the recovery of neurological function in patients after a traumatic spinal cord injury. The researchers wrote that this dysbiosis can both cause and exacerbate a number of diseases. The study authors studied changes in the mice’s microbiomes after their injuries for a month to predict the range of their locomotor impairment, they wrote.

Ohio State Scientists Explain How Gut Microbes Change After Spinal Cord Injury

Published: October 17, 2016

pop-phillipCOLUMBUS, Ohio – The community of bacteria that live in our intestines, also called the “gut microbiome,” is important to normal intestinal function. Knowing that spinal cord injuries often negatively affect the gut’s ability to do its job, researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center showed that spinal cord injury causes profound changes in the gut microbiota. They also showed that feeding mice probiotics after a spinal cord injury confers neuroprotection and improves functional recovery.

The findings are published online today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

United Spinal Association Recruiting People with Spinal Cord Injury and Disease for a Study...

Published: March 17, 2016

United-Spinal-AssociationNEW YORK, March 17, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — United Spinal Association is working with MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital and Children’s National Medical Center to learn more about the experiences of people who use intermittent catheterization and who experience urinary symptoms frequently.

The research team at MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital, located in Washington, DC (*participants can be located anywhere in the USA), noticed during a past study that people with bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury or disease (SCI/D) had much less Lactobacillus (a ‘healthy’ bacteria) in their urine, compared with those who didn’t have SCI/D.

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