Sunday, September 27, 2020

Tag: Schwann cells

Transplantation Safety Trial Using Schwann Cells Completed Successfully

Published: March 3, 2017

The Miami Project, at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, today announced the publication of its first Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Phase I clinical trial involving Schwann cells used to repair the damaged spinal cord, in the February issue of the Journal of Neurotrauma.  Schwann cells are essential for the repair of nerve damage, and long thought to be able to increase recovery after spinal cord injury. The trial, performed at University of Miami / Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, is the first in a series designed to evaluate the safety and feasibility of transplanting autologous human Schwann cells to treat individuals with spinal cord injuries.

Olfactory cells transplanted to treat spinal cord injury

Published: June 19, 2015

Three years after they treated patients with spinal cord injury in a randomized clinical trial with transplanted cells from the patients’ olfactory mucosa (nasal cavities) to build a ‘bridge’ to span the gap between the damaged ends of the spinal cord, researchers found that some recipients had experienced a range of modest improvements and determined that the use of olfactory mucosa lamina propria (OLP) transplants was ‘promising and safe.’

Study finds axon regeneration after Schwann cell graft to injured spinal cord

Published: December 23, 2013

Putnam Valley, NY. (Dec. 23 2013) – A study carried out at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine for “The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis” has found that transplanting self-donated Schwann cells (SCs, the principal ensheathing cells of the nervous system) that are elongated so as to bridge scar tissue in the injured spinal cord, aids hind limb functional recovery in rats modeled with spinal cord injury. The study will be published in a future issue of Cell Transplantation.

Doctors seek new subjects after first successful cell transplant

Published: March 14, 2013

miami-project-cure-for-paralysis-logoAfter decades of research, The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis has completed its first human cell transplant for a spinal cord injury.

Doctors grew what are called Schwann cells from nerve tissue taken from an unidentified man’s leg, then transplanted them back into his own body. The patient now has passed the critical 30-day, post-operation period without complications, giving researchers hope that they’re headed toward curing paralysis and developing treatments for neurological conditions like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.