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Articles Tagged: Study

New Neural Network Can Restore Diaphragm Function after Spinal Cord Injury

Published: October 17, 2017 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury:

Bottom Line: A team of neuroscientists has uncovered a neural network that can restore diaphragm function after spinal cord injury. The network allows the diaphragm to contract without input from the brain, which could help paralyzed spinal cord injury patients breathe without a respirator.

Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cell Reports

Author: Jared Cregg, Neurosciences graduate student at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, Ohio is first author on the study. Continue Reading »

New functional scoring helps better treatment for SCI during hESC

Published: October 6, 2017 | Category: News

During the past 2 decades, cell-based therapies for SCI have been researched in several studies. Replacement of damaged neural tissues and re-establishing connections between the central and peripheral nervous system is vital for the treatment strategy for patients with SCI. According to factsheet of WHO, over 5 hundred thousand people are estimated to suffer from SCI per year. American Spinal Injury Association’s (ASIA) Impairment Scale is a universally accepted scale to assess the SCI, but this scale does not cover all parameters of SCI. Development of new scoring system by Nutech mediworld has the remaining parameters covered in its Nutech Functional score(NFS). Continue Reading »

Researchers Turn Skin Cells into Motor Neurons Without Using Stem Cells

Published: September 7, 2017 | Category: News

Cellular Renovation

Why build something from the ground up when one can just renovate an already existing structure? Essentially, that’s what researchers from the University of Washington School of Medicine in St. Louis had in mind when they developed a method for transforming adult human skin cells into motor neurons in a lab. They published their work in the journal Cell Stem Cell. Continue Reading »

Nanoparticles limit damage in spinal cord injury

Published: September 5, 2017 | Category: News

Injection after an injury reduces inflammation and scarring

After a spinal cord injury, a significant amount of secondary nerve damage is caused by inflammation and internal scarring that inhibits the ability of the nervous system to repair itself.

A biodegradable nanoparticle injected after a spinal cord trauma prevented the inflammation and internal scarring that inhibits the repair process, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. Continue Reading »

Exercise Improves Fitness and Strength for Adults with Spinal Cord Injury

Published: August 3, 2017 | Category: Information

Exercise is particularly beneficial for adults with chronic spinal cord injuries, says a review published by NeurologyNow.

Does Exercise Help?

People with spinal cord injuries are far less active compared to people in the general population and even compared to people with other disabilities.

That’s why researchers in the United Kingdom and Canada decided to review the available evidence to see how much and what types of exercise are beneficial for people with these types of injuries. Continue Reading »

Asterias Biotherapeutics Receives FDA Clearance to Enroll C-4 Patients in SCiStar Study

Published: July 10, 2017 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury:

Ability to enroll patients with second most common cervical spinal cord injury broadens eligible population for SCiStar study and future trials

FREMONT, Calif., July 10, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Asterias Biotherapeutics, Inc. (NYSE MKT: AST), a biotechnology company pioneering the field of regenerative medicine, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted the company’s amendment to the clinical research protocol for its ongoing AST-OPC1 SCiStar Phase 1/2a clinical trial in motor complete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). The amendment expands the eligibility criteria to include patients with a C-4 spinal cord injury and extends the dosing window from 14 to 30 days to 21 to 42 days post-injury. Continue Reading »

UH Study: Wheelchair Rugby Lowers Depression and Stress in Spinal Cord Injury Patients

Published: June 15, 2017 | Category: News

Wheelchair rugby is a high-octane team contact sport changing the lives and mental health of the spinal cord injury patients who play it. Continue Reading »

Dr. Monica Perez’s Team Shows First Evidence of Using Cortical Targets to Improve Motor Function

Published: June 13, 2017 | Category: News

Monica A. Perez, P.T., Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Neurological Surgery and The Miami Project, and colleagues, recently published A novel cortical target to enhance hand motor output in humans with spinal cord injury in the June issue of Brain that provides the first evidence that cortical targets could represent a novel therapeutic site for improving motor function in humans paralyzed by spinal cord injury (SCI).

A main goal of rehabilitation strategies in humans with SCI is to strengthen transmission in spared neural networks. Although neuromodulatory strategies have targeted different sites within the central nervous system to restore motor function following SCI, the role of cortical targets remains poorly understood. Continue Reading »

Spinal Cord Injury Research: Mayo Clinic Radio

Published: May 6, 2017 | Category: News

Dr. Kristin Zhao, director of Mayo Clinic’s Assistive and Restorative Technology Laboratory, and Dr. Kendall Lee, director of Mayo Clinic’s Neural Engineering Laboratory, will discuss research that has successfully used intense physical therapy and electrical stimulation of the spinal cord to return voluntary movements to a previously paralyzed patient. Continue Reading »

New discovery in spinal cord injuries shows oxygen can improve blood flow and restore motor function: U of A study

Published: May 1, 2017 | Category: News

Neuroscientists at University of AlbertaA new discovery at the University of Alberta will fundamentally alter how we view spinal cord function and rehabilitation after spinal cord injuries (SCI). Neuroscientists found that spinal blood flow in rats was unexpectedly compromised long after a spinal cord injury (chronically ischemia), and that improving blood flow or simply inhaling more oxygen produces lasting improvements in cord oxygenation and motor functions, such as walking.

Previous work had shown that while blood flow was temporarily disrupted at the injury site, it resumed rapidly, and it was more or less assumed that the blood flow was normal below the injury. This turns out to be wrong. Continue Reading »