Saturday, March 6, 2021

Tag: Study

New treatment allows some people with spinal cord injury to regain hand and arm...

Published: January 12, 2021

Note: This video was created in January 2020

Almost 18,000 Americans experience traumatic spinal cord injuries every year. Many of these people are unable to use their hands and arms and can’t do everyday tasks such as eating, grooming or drinking water without help.

Brain May Age Faster After Spinal Cord Injury

Published: January 5, 2021

TUESDAY, Jan. 5, 2021 (HealthDay News) — A new study supports the theory that people who suffer a spinal cord injury may also have accelerated brain aging that affects how fast they process information.

Those “cognitive deficits” are similar to those in older adults, according to research from the nonprofit Kessler Foundation in New Jersey.

Scientists Explore Deficits in Processing Speed in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

Published: December 30, 2020

Research team finds persons with spinal cord injury and older healthy individuals have similar brain activation during processing speed tasks. Findings support the theory of accelerated cognitive aging following spinal cord injury

East Hanover, NJ. December 30, 2020. A team of rehabilitation researchers has studied processing speed deficits in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI), comparing their brain activation patterns with those of healthy age-matched controls, and older healthy individuals. They found that the SCI group and older controls had similar activation patterns, but the SCI group differed significantly from their age-matched controls.

Scar-free healing after spinal cord injury relies on specialized cells

Published: October 8, 2020

One of the reasons people rarely recover from spinal cord injury is the scar tissue that develops, preventing nerve cells from reconnecting. But a new study from Zhigang He, PhD, of the F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center at Boston Children’s Hospital, demonstrated a way to minimize scar cell formation in adult mice after a spinal cord injury. The study, published in Nature, offers insights for new approaches to treating spinal cord injuries.

Biologist awarded $1.8M to study neuronal reprograming for spinal cord repair

Published: August 24, 2020

National Institutes of Health grant will enable Hedong Li to focus on role of micorRNAs in the reprogramming process

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Hedong Li, associate research professor of biology, has been awarded $1.8 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study how microRNAs — small segments of genetic material — could be used in treatments for spinal cord injury. The five-year grant builds upon previous work by Li and colleagues to convert glial cells, support cells that surround neurons, into functioning neurons.

Dorsal root ganglion stimulation evokes motor responses in patients with complete spinal cord injury

Published: August 14, 2020 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Sadaf SoloukeyBilateral L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) stimulation has been shown to evoke strong and reproducible motor responses in the upper leg in patients with chronic motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI).

In their paper published in Neuromodulation, authors Sadaf Soloukey and colleagues from Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, refer to their study as the “first of its kind” to demonstrate the potential of the DRG as a new target for reproducible and potentially weight-bearing muscle recruitment in this particular cohort of patients.

Research Identifies a Protein for Tissue Repair After the Spinal Cord Injury

Published: March 4, 2020

Recently researchers discovered an axon guidance protein known as Plexin B2 in the central nervous system (CNS). During the spinal cord injury, this protein plays a significant role in the healing of the wound and neural repair.

The experiment was designed and conducted by the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. This study could help the development of the treatments or therapies which target axon guidance pathways for treating the patients of Spinal cord injury more effectively.

Can an Active Lifestyle Improve Recovery After a Spinal Cord Injury?

Published: January 23, 2020

Permanent neurological impairments can occur after spinal cord injury (SCI) due to the failure of the spinal cord motor and sensory axons to regenerate.

This is because the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), unlike in some amphibians and reptiles, has inhibitory molecules blocking growth post-development, as well as the lack of an effective regenerative response system. Within the peripheral nervous system (PNS), there is some limited axonal recovery that can occur naturally.

UBC researchers seek participants for spinal cord injury study

Published: January 13, 2020

Chronic pain is a common and often debilitating problem that can significantly impact function and quality of life for patients with spinal cord injury.

To help find treatment solutions, UBC researchers are investigating the effectiveness of a drug called Targin at treating chronic pain in individuals with spinal cord injury. The research team is now recruiting study participants.

ReNetX Bio Receives Fast Track Designation From U.S. FDA

Published: January 8, 2020

Potential First-in-Class Therapy for Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

NEW HAVEN, Conn., Jan. 08, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — ReNetX Bio announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted the company Fast Track Designation for ReNetX Bio’s clinical therapy (AXER-204) for the potential treatment of Chronic Spinal Cord Injury (SCI).  ReNetX Bio is currently conducting a Phase 1/2 clinical trial “RESET” in patients with SCI, with topline results expected in 2021.