Thursday, August 22, 2019

Tag: tips

How to cope with your spinal cord injury – 8 tips for newly injured...

Published: May 15, 2019

8 do’s and don’t s on how to cope with your new spinal cord injury.

Nurses’ role in both prevention and treatment of cervical and lumbar injuries

Published: May 21, 2018

A spinal cord injury is devastating for a patient, their family and their caregivers. Every 44 minutes a person sustains a spinal cord injury (SCI) in the United States resulting in approximately 12,000 SCIs each year.1 There are more than 265,000 persons currently living with this type of injury in the United States, and one out of every 50 persons lives with paralysis. 1 So as nurses, what can we do to reduce the risk of spinal cord injury in hopes of positively affecting these statistics?

5 Ways to Get Cool FAST with a Spinal Cord Injury

Published: June 8, 2017

The human body is a marvel. Somehow it ended up with the ability to cool itself via sweat, but when you have a spinal cord injury this ability is turned off. Many are shocked to hear this, but when you have a spinal cord injury, you really can no longer sweat. Not surprisingly, this can cause some pretty gnarly health scares.

I’ve gone through all the heat-induced scary scenarios you can imagine as a result, and as the years march on I’ve noticed my temperature regulation is worse than ever (if that is even possible; oh quadriplegia you tricky minx). But I guess this is what comes with aging. Something to look forward to for all you kiddos out there.

Air Travel with a Spinal Cord Injury

Published: March 2, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Aaron Baker, Shield HealthCare’s Spinal Cord Injury Lifestyle Specialist, takes on his trip, from the airport to his bulkhead seat.

inventability.net

Published: January 8, 2017

Inventions, hacks, fixes, tutorials, tips… Invent/ability is a collection of useful solutions to everyday problems like: how to drink coffee without using your hands, how to hack a wheelchair, and how to smartify your home.

Stuart is quadriplegic; he can’t use his arms and legs at all; he can move his head and has about 5mm of reliable control in his right middle finger, and he has severe, complex, and degenerating health issues. This is far from the most interesting thing about him, but it’s important to grasp the extent to which he must “act at a distance” by designing systems and processes to carry out the business of daily living without physical contact. Imagine a house with no light switches, no door handles, no buttons on the phone or taps on the sink or knobs on the boiler.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!