Thursday, December 5, 2019

Tag: University of Alberta

First global Open Data Commons for preclinical Spinal Cord Injury research will be a...

Published: August 15, 2019

University of Alberta research team receives $3.3 million to create open-source database for international spinal cord injury research

The University of Alberta and the University of California, San Francisco are teaming up to launch the world’s first Open Data Commons for preclinical Spinal Cord Injury research (ODC-SCI). A consortium of international organizations will be providing $3.3 million CAD to help fund the initiative. The ODC-SCI will improve spinal cord injury research and treatment worldwide by reducing data bias and equipping scientists by making data more accessible, enhancing research and translational efforts.

Inflammation discovery opens window to better rehabilitation possibilities

Published: June 26, 2018

Findings could have significant impact on how spinal cord injuries are treated in the future

Inflammation plays a key role in improving the ability to relearn motor skills lost as a result of spinal cord injuries, such as grasping objects, new University of Alberta research shows.

U of A spinal cord researchers Karim Fouad, a Canada Research Chair in the Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, and Abel Torres Espín studied inflammation and rehabilitation training in rodents and discovered that creating a mild inflammatory response improved a rat’s ability to relearn how to pick up pellets months following a spinal cord injury.

New discovery in spinal cord injuries shows oxygen can improve blood flow and restore...

Published: May 1, 2017

Neuroscientists at University of AlbertaA new discovery at the University of Alberta will fundamentally alter how we view spinal cord function and rehabilitation after spinal cord injuries (SCI). Neuroscientists found that spinal blood flow in rats was unexpectedly compromised long after a spinal cord injury (chronically ischemia), and that improving blood flow or simply inhaling more oxygen produces lasting improvements in cord oxygenation and motor functions, such as walking.

Previous work had shown that while blood flow was temporarily disrupted at the injury site, it resumed rapidly, and it was more or less assumed that the blood flow was normal below the injury. This turns out to be wrong.

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