Monday, December 9, 2019

Monthly Archives: September 2005

RUSSIAN STEM-CELL THERAPY

Published: September 29, 2005 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , , , , ,

We are a part of a global community in which the devastation of spinal cord injury (SCI) bows to no flag, and solutions will not be any country’s exclusive domain. Integrating the diverse pieces of the puzzle necessary to develop real-world solutions requires that we open-mindedly work in cooperation and not in competition. With such cooperation, restored function after SCI will be a coalescing reality and not just a never-ending, elusive pie-in-the-sky dream.

In this spirit of bridge-building, I recently traveled to Moscow, Russia where I became the first American scientist to check-out an innovative stem-cell program for SCI developed by the NeuroVita Clinic under the direction of Dr. Andrey Bryukhovetskiy. His work is especially important because few scientists have accumulated as much hands-on experience as he has in treating human SCI with stem cells, an approach many experts believe will play a key therapeutic role in the future.

National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 2005

Published: September 29, 2005

logo1-150A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America

Across America, individuals with disabilities are making important contributions in the workplace. This month, we celebrate their accomplishments and reaffirm our commitment to ensuring that the opportunities of America are available and accessible to every citizen.

RECOVERING FROM MOUNTAIN BIKE ACCIDENT

Published: September 27, 2005

Last fall we brought you the story of Neil Maberry. Maberry suffered a debilitating spinal cord injury after a mountain bike accident this past August. Reporter Brian Latham talked with Neil Mayberry about his will to walk again.

Only three weeks ago, this wasn’t possible, now with some assistance, Neil Maberry is up and exercising, going faster all the time.

Threats to Ventilator Users

Published: September 26, 2005

State governments in the US are currently under intense pressure to limit or reduce Medicaid expenditures. Unless we make our voices heard, there may be serious consequences for Ventilator users — new restrictions that limit their access to community-based care and independent living arrangements. International Ventilator Users Network is urgently concerned about these developments, and seeks your support for a resolution developed by its Consumer Advisory Committee.

Autonomic Dysreflexia

Published: September 23, 2005

The Autonomic Nervous System often becomes hyperactive in people with spinal cord injury. Autonomic Dysreflexia manifests in large increases in blood pressure (hypertension) with systolic pressures exceeding 200 mm Hg, slow (Bradycardia) or fast heart rate (tachycardia), headaches, facial flushing, exuberant sweating, hyperthermia, stuffy nose, goose pimples, nausea, and other signs of autonomic hyperactivity. Called autonomic dysreflexia, these episodes may be spontaneously or may be instigated by infection, pain, or other conditions that stimulate the autonomic nervous system. Severe autonomic dysreflexia may be life-threatening.

What is meant by the terms “complete” and “incomplete” injuries?

Published: September 22, 2005

Complete injuries result in total loss of sensation and function below the injury level. Incomplete injuries result in partial loss.

“Complete” does not necessarily mean the cord has been severed. Each of the above categories can occur in paraplegia and quadriplegia.

What is autonomic dysreflexia?

Published: September 22, 2005

The Autonomic Nervous System often becomes hyperactive in people with spinal cord injury. Autonomic Dysreflexia manifests in large increases in blood pressure (hypertension) with systolic pressures exceeding 200 mm Hg, slow (Bradycardia) or fast heart rate (tachycardia), headaches, facial flushing, exuberant sweating, hyperthermia, stuffy nose, goose pimples, nausea, and other signs of autonomic hyperactivity. Called autonomic dysreflexia, these episodes may be spontaneously or may be instigated by infection, pain, or other conditions that stimulate the autonomic nervous system. Severe autonomic dysreflexia may be life-threatening.

How does spinal cord injury affect the skin?

Published: September 21, 2005

Spinal cord injury reduces or eliminates skin sensation in dermatomes below the injury site. Because people cannot feel or move, they may sit or lie for long times on certain parts of their body. Pressure impedes blood flow in the skin. Due to muscle atrophy, the normal tissue padding that cushions the butt may be reduced. Absence of sensation, loss of muscle padding, and long periods of pressure can lead to skin breakdown and development of pressure sores or decubiti. Decubiti are potentially life threatening but preventable.

Phantom pain after spinal cord injury is result of hypersensitive neurons in thalamic region...

Published: September 20, 2005

Yale researchers report the first evidence that phantom pain following spinal cord injury is the result of hypersensitive neurons in the thalamic region of the brain that can be suppressed with specially designed molecular agents.

“A majority of people with spinal cord injury and limb amputations experience phantom sensations of excruciating pain at or below the level of their paralysis or loss,” said Bryan Hains, associate research scientist and co-author of the study.

What happens to the bladder, bowel, and sexual function?

Published: September 19, 2005

The spinal cord also carries “autonomic” signals that control blood pressure, blood flow, breathing, sweating, bowel, bladder, sexual, and other autonomic functions.

• Bladder Paralysis and Spasticity. Spinal cord injury paralyzes the bladder. The bladder must be catheterized to drain urine. Indwelling catheters (such as a foley catheter inserted through the urethra) have a high risk of infections. Sterile intermittent catheterization is recommended but may be complicated by bladder spasticity or spontaneous contractions of the bladder. Bladder contractions can push urine into the kidney and this may lead to kidney damage.

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