Thursday, January 23, 2020

Monthly Archives: April 2007

High 5 Goes to Couple Who Help Quadriplegics

Published: April 22, 2007

1144842(KSL News) It takes a lot of strength and determination to make it through a serious physical injury.

A Salt Lake City man and his wife have dedicated their lives to helping quadriplegics.

Tim and Karen Daynes were nominated for a High 5 by Brandon May, who met the couple when he joined the Utah Scorpions Quad rugby team. Brandon says he is so appreciative of their friendship and example.

Girl paralyzed allowed legal recourse

Published: April 21, 2007

MANKATO— The family of a Madison Lake girl who was paralyzed after back surgery can seek punitive damages from the former Mankato neurosurgeon they are suing.

Scott and Lisa Hammett, on behalf of their 13-year-old daughter, Kourtney, sued Dr. Guy Sava and ISJ Mayo Health a year ago.

The suit alleges Sava performed unnecessary surgery and did the procedure wrong, despite advice from another neurosurgeon.

Will to walk gets Bellevue man back on his feet

Published: April 20, 2007

2003675245On March 7, 2001, Bruce Hanson, all 6 feet and 5 inches of him, found himself lying on his back in the snow at Alpental.

It was a clear and brilliant afternoon, and Hanson was supposed to be skiing the final run of the day with his 10-year-old daughter, Heather.

Instead of schussing down the slopes, his skis were above his head, aligned with the tops of the trees. Hanson remembers knowing that he’d broken his neck because he couldn’t feel his legs.

A doctor later told him that his injury resembled the kind once inflicted by the mafia — a partial severing of the spinal cord designed to maim, but not to kill.

Gene plays key role in embryonic, adult stem cells

Published: April 18, 2007

stemcells_geneOne gene directs both embryonic and adult stem cells to perform the self-renewal function that is crucial in their potential broad use in medical treatments, researchers said on Thursday.

While the biology of these types of stem cells is very different, a study published in the journal Cell showed that they share at least this one key feature — a gene called Zfx that controls their ability to self-renew.

Stem cells are a kind of master cell for the body, capable of transforming into various tissue and cell types, offering hope that they can be used to repair tissue damaged by disease or injury.

New hope for spinal cord injury sufferers

Published: April 17, 2007

Spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the most significant forms of neurotrauma with major economic and social impact.

Every year, nearly 12,000 individuals in the United States and Canada, mostly young adults, sustain a SCI. According to the Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC), SCI costs an estimated $9.7 billion each year in the United States alone. Although there are some early pharmacological and surgical interventions that may diminish the severity of SCI, the overall impact of these treatments remains minimal.

Quadriplegic graduate student, avid sports fan dies at age 27

Published: April 17, 2007

mbrentMichael Brent, a UK graduate student, avid sports fan and former athlete who developed Quadriplegia after a car accident in high school, died at 6 a.m. yesterday from stomach ulcer complications. He was 27.

Originally from Campbellsburg, Ky., Brent began studying at UK in 2000, and the people who knew him all remember the same thing – his positive outlook on life.

Brent, a former Kernel and recent Cats’ Pause reporter, inspired a foundation in his name to raise money for spinal cord research. He received a degree in journalism from UK in 2004 and was going to graduate from UK’s communication graduate program in May.

Drug Shows Promise in Spinal Cord Injury Treatment

Published: April 16, 2007

(HealthDay News) — A drug called Cethrin shows promise in treating people with spinal cord injury (SCI), according to a study by American and Canadian researchers.

Cethrin inhibits Rho, a signaling master switch that, when activated, triggers cell death and increases damage after SCI. Tests in animals with SCI have found that Cethrin inhibits cell death and promotes neural Regeneration.

This one-year study looked at the use of Cethrin (a recombinant protein) formulated with a fibrin sealant in 37 patients who had just suffered an SCI that left them with no sensory or Motor function below the area of the injury.

Speaker asks students to stay safe before prom

Published: April 16, 2007

ThinkFirst program targets brain and spinal cord injuries in teens, young adults

In one split second eight years ago Chad Thomas’ life changed forever. Driving home at night after work, he fell asleep at the wheel. The next morning, he learned he would never walk again.

As a teenager, Thomas wasn’t so different from many of the local high school students he spoke to in West Hancock’s packed gym Monday afternoon. He was a four-sport athlete, excelling in track. He had just graduated from high school where he grew up in Spirit Lake, and planned to start college in the fall. But a lapse in judgment when he got in his car one night changed all that.

At the time of his accident, Thomas was not wearing a seat belt.

Treatment Holds Promise for Thousands of Patients Impacted by Spinal Cord Injury

Published: April 15, 2007

Newswise — Spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the most significant forms of neurotrauma with major economic and social impact. Every year, nearly 12,000 individuals in the United States and Canada, mostly young adults, sustain a SCI. According to the Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC), SCI costs an estimated $9.7 billion each year in the United States alone. Although there are some early pharmacological and surgical interventions that may diminish the severity of SCI, the overall impact of these treatments remains minimal.

Los Angeles Man Working To Beat Comeback Odds After Spinal Cord Injury Leads To...

Published: April 14, 2007 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

According to the diagnostic scans, Leon Smith would never be able to reach out with his arms, grasp with his hands or take another step.

But the X-rays and MRIs were completed last August after Smith suffered a devastating injury to his spinal cord. Today, the Los Angeles resident is working toward resuming a normal life after two operations at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center gave him a chance to beat overwhelming odds.

“This is a one-in-a-million case,” said Justin D. Paquette, M.D., neurosurgeon at the Cedars-Sinai Institute for Spinal Disorders. “He was quadriplegic and Ventilator-dependent (unable to breathe on his own). A patient who is in this condition, with persistent spinal cord compression for even 24 hours, has essentially zero chance of recovery. Mr. Smith had been like this for almost a week before he came to Cedars-Sinai.”

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