Friday, March 5, 2021

Monthly Archives: October 2007

Cooling Therapy Helps NFL Player Overcome Paralysis

Published: October 18, 2007

thermia-220x165An experimental treatment – inducing Hypothermia – has been helping a professional football player make a remarkable recovery from a paralyzing injury. Cooling therapy, also being used in Triangle hospitals, has made the recovery possible.

Buffalo Bills tight end Kevin Everett sustained a severe spinal cord injury in the season opener against Denver on Sept. 9. The third and fourth Vertebrae in his neck were fractured, leaving him paralyzed.

“Not only do you wonder if they’re ever going to walk again, you wonder if they’ll actually going to be able to survive the injury,” said Dr. Jeffrey Goldstein, with the New York University Hospital for Joint Disease.

Dallas man receives national attention

Published: October 18, 2007

Nick Suckow of rural Dallas has recently found himself gaining a lot of national attention just by following where his heart leads him.

After suffering a spinal cord injury back in 1989, Nick became a Ventilator-dependant quadriplegic. The condition did not dampen his spirits, however, and Nick’s aunt, Sue Perry, nominated him earlier this month to be amongst 2007’s inductees for the Spinal Cord Injury Hall of Fame.

This hall of fame was organized in 2005 by the National Spinal Cord Injury Association in order to celebrate those that have worked toward a better future for all individuals with a damaged spinal cord.

Use of Botox® soon after spinal injury studied as way to prevent overactive bladder

Published: October 17, 2007

HOUSTON — (October 18, 2007) — Can Botox®, used early, help spinal cord injury patients who have an overactive bladder?

Dr. Christopher Smith, assistant professor of urology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, hopes a federally funded study conducted in conjunction with Memorial Hermann/The Institute for Rehabilitation and Research in Houston, will answer the question. BCM is one of 10 sites participating in the national study.

Spinal cord injuries from a variety of accidents affect approximately 250,000 Americans.

Primolicious – Disability Community

Published: October 17, 2007

Primolicious - Disability Community
Primolicious - Disability Community

Primolicious is the cozy online gathering place for the DisabilityCommunity where Partners with common interests and challenges connect,share and support one another.

A great place to learn more about disabilities and to connect with others who may be confronting similar challenges.

Stand Strong Again

Published: October 17, 2007
Stand Strong Again
Stand Strong Again

Action sports such as motocross,skiing, snowboarding, skateboarding and BMX have become an importantpart of the fabric that is our youth-oriented society. More and morepeople are entering this world on a daily basis for a variety ofreasons. Some are just looking for an interesting way to get exercise;some are finding a way to quench their thirst for an adrenaline rushand still others are looking for fame and fortune. Whatever the motive,everyone of these participants faces potentially significant and lifealtering risks everyday.We believe that everyone that participates in action sports deserves to have a foundationin place that will provide a solid source of support to help those injured and in need.Stand Strong Again is desgined to be that foundation.

Researchers Working On The Development Of Drugs To Limit Neuronal Death After Spinal Cord...

Published: October 16, 2007

Neurons die en masse when the spinal cord is injured or when a person suffers a stroke. Researchers of the Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) Berlin-Buch, Germany, and of Aarhus University, Denmark, have unraveled the molecular mechanism which causes the death not only of damaged neurons, but also of healthy nerve cells.

In animal experiments, they have now been able to demonstrate that neuronal cell death can be reduced when the gene of one the key players in this process is knocked out. The research results of Professor Thomas E. Willnow (MDC) and Professor Anders Nykjaer (Aarhus University) have been published online in Nature Neuroscience (DOI: 10.1038/nn2000)*. Now they are working on the development of drugs to limit neuronal cell death after spinal cord injury.

QuadJoy Adaptive Mouse and Accessories

Published: October 16, 2007
QuadJoy Adaptive Mouse and Accessories
QuadJoy Adaptive Mouse and Accessories

QuadJoy, an orally-controlled Mouse, is an alternative to the hand-controlled Mouse. QuadJoy enables people with limited or no hand mobility to operate their computers.

Hundreds of QuadJoys have been sold to customers worldwide. Now they can chat, play games or surf the Web.

Everett progressing in recovery from spinal cord injury

Published: October 15, 2007

Kevin Everett has developed enough strength to hold himself up briefly on a walker, and he can also use his feet to push himself around in a wheelchair, the latest signs of progress as the Buffalo Bills’ tight end recovers from a severe spinal cord injury.

“He’s making very solid and noticeable progress,” Eric Armstead, an associate of the player’s agent, Brian Overstreet, told The Associated Press on Tuesday. “He’s very excited.”

Armstead regularly visits Everett, who entered the second phase of his recovery process three weeks ago when he was transferred to Houston’s Memorial Hermann Hospital Rehabilitation center.

Armstead is most impressed by how Everett has been able to maneuver himself in a wheelchair.

University of Pittsburgh Awarded $4.75 Million Grant to Improve Treatment of Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: October 14, 2007

The U.S. Department of Education’s National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research has awarded a $4.75 million grant to the University of Pittsburgh to create the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC) on Spinal Cord Injury.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences (SHRS) designed the center to address significant issues for people with spinal cord injury. The RERC team and collaborators include the department of rehabilitation science and technology, the department of physical medicine and rehabilitation, the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine and the department of Occupational Therapy at the University of Pittsburgh, in addition to Case Western Reserve University, Northwestern University, Baylor College of Medicine, IBM and Immunetrics.

Adaptive Video Game Controllers for Quadriplegics

Published: October 14, 2007
Quad Control
Quad Control

Adaptive Products for Independent Living and Recreation

Video Game Joysticksfor Quadriplegics. The KYE joystick allows you to play mostgames.It mountson a table or wheelchair. They also have Big Button Electric Bed Controllersfor people who can’t use their fingers. Also Sip-Puff Switchesfor people who can’t use their hands.

KYE has been making adaptive products since 1981