Saturday, August 17, 2019

Tag: ADA

Google Nest Partners with the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation to Improve Independence for...

Published: July 26, 2019

Google Nest provides up to 100,000 free Google Home Minis to the Reeve Foundation to foster freedom at home across the paralysis community through the #PowerOfVoice

SHORT HILLS, N.J., July 26, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — In celebration of the anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, the leading nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life for people living with paralysis, announced today a partnership with Google Nest to improve independence for the greater paralysis community through Google Nest products powered by the Google Assistant.

California’s accessible campsites put the outdoors within reach

Published: March 25, 2019

When Steve Dalton sets up at Yosemite’s Housekeeping Camp, a popular campground along the Merced River with views of Half Dome and Yosemite Falls, it takes him back to childhood camping trips with his parents and a time before his spinal cord injury.

“I love getting outdoors and I think, following my disability, adaptive sports and things that drew me back outside were the things that were most restorative for me as a person,” said Dalton, 51, an information technology systems administrator who is paralyzed from the chest down since a motorcycle accident in 2002.

All Wheels Up

Published: March 20, 2019

The purpose of All Wheels Up, Inc. is to advocate for equality in air travel for those in a wheelchair for mobility and safe seating.

Our Goal is for all those in power chairs, as well as properly modified manual chairs, to independently maneuver themselves onto the plane with dignity. We plan to work with aircraft manufactures and air carriers to look to the future and make appropriate changes for the disabled, just as building owners and other transportation companies have already done due to the ADA.

No Flipping Excuses

Published: January 4, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Changing the lives for those that are living with a disability.

‘It’s all about adapting’: How a wheelchair user made his house accessible

Published: October 30, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Thomas Rogers’s house has a lowered kitchen counter, wide hallways, and a elevator

When it comes to what he can and can’t do in his house, compared with an able-bodied person, Thomas Rogers says the only difference is that he can’t reach the top of his closet.

“That’s about it!” he said.

Rogers has made his house in Portugal Cove-St. Philip’s into an entirely accessible living space.

REINVENTING THE WHEEL: Stories of Life After Spinal Cord Injury

Published: July 14, 2015

Reinventing the Wheel Reveca Torres21 Photographers + 21 People with Spinal Cord Injury = 21 Photo Stories about ABILITY

The NATIONAL MUSEUM OF HEALTH + MEDICINE CHICAGO, with KEEPSAYK LLC, a pioneering Chicago Tech Startup, and BACKBONES, a nonprofit providing support for people with spinal cord injuries, announce the online debut of an innovative collaborative awareness project, Reinventing the Wheel: Stories of Life After Spinal Cord Injury, in recognition of ADA25, the 25 anniversary of the enactment of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Many gyms not fully accessible to people in wheelchairs

Published: April 23, 2015

(Reuters Health) – While some fitness centers may be accessible enough for wheelchairs to get through the door, most lack all of the accommodations necessary for people with limited mobility to use the gym, a small Mississippi study suggests.

All 10 gyms the researchers examined in Hattiesburg, Mississippi had elevators, and most had accessible parking and ramps, accommodations recommended by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). But none had equipment designed for use by people in wheelchairs or staff trained to help these individuals work out.

Quadriplegic teacher helped make history

Published: February 14, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Lex Frieden helped make historyHOUSTON — After the head-on car crash, Lex Frieden thought he was OK.

He’d been in the back seat, not the front, that fall night in 1967, and he wasn’t bleeding.

“I’m fine,” he said, as medical personnel rushed to help the others. “I just can’t move.”

The 18-year-old freshman at Oklahoma State University had a broken neck. Days and weeks would pass before he fully understood what that meant.

Quadriplegic fights ADA abuse

Published: January 24, 2015

Brad PetersEvery move that Brad Peters makes is thought out.

The zipper on his sweatshirt includes a small piece of thin tied rope so that his fingers can fit through the loop and pull down if he has to.

His cell phone hangs from the side of his motorized wheelchair with the same rigging so he’s able to easily grasp it and flip it open in case he receives a phone call or has to make one – the latter of which can be a difficult task for a quadriplegic that has spent more than three decades finding ways to live with his disabilities.

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