Sunday, December 15, 2019

Tag: CNS

Neural stem cells regenerate axons

Published: September 13, 2012

SAN DIEGO — In a study at the University of California, San Diego and VA San Diego Healthcare, researchers were able to regenerate “an astonishing degree” of axonal growth at the site of severe spinal cord injury in rats. Their research revealed that early stage neurons have the ability to survive and extend axons to form new, functional neuronal relays across an injury site in the adult central nervous system (CNS).

The study also proved that at least some types of adult CNS axons can overcome a normally inhibitory growth environment to grow over long distances. Importantly, stem cells across species exhibit these properties. The work will be published in the journal Cell on Friday (Sept. 14).

Working2Walk 2011, Jerry Silver

Published: October 26, 2011

ROBUST FUNCTIONAL REGENERATION BEYOND THE GLIAL SCAR

Working2Walk 2011, W. Dalton Dietrich, PhD

Published: October 20, 2011

THE MIAMI PROJECT TO CURE PARALYSIS: CURRENT STUDIES TARGETING THERAPEUTIC HYPOTHERMIA AND SCHWANN CELL TRANSPLANTATION

Preliminary Human Experiments to Test Safety of Nerve Cell Transplants for Spinal Cord Paralysis

Published: October 19, 2011

The new approach, currently being studied by the FDA for phase I trials, avoids the problems of immunological rejection and the controversy around the use of embryonic stem cells

ROCKVILLE, Md.—A new experiment aimed at achieving actor Christopher Reeve​’s dream of finding an effective treatment for spinal paralysis was announced this week at an international meeting of scientists and people with spinal cord injury sponsored by the United 2 Fight Paralysis Foundation. The approach, which already is shown to be promising in animals and avoids the need for patients to take immunosuppressive drugs, has not yet been proved effective in humans. Nonetheless, patients are excited to see this advance as they have been frustrated waiting for the first human trials of the new approach.

The cure for paralysis?

Published: October 4, 2011

In May 2011, UC Irvine opened the doors to the Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center, a 100,000 square foot facility that cost nearly $80 million to construct.

The center ushered in a new future for stem cell research. Being the first major stem cell research facility in Southern California, the scientists here at UC Irvine have already begun to prove the benefits of the research that they are doing here.

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