Saturday, August 15, 2020

Tag: Dr. Reggie Edgerton

UCLA scientist gives couple hope while searching for a cure for paralysis

Published: September 13, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Mark Pollock, Simone George tell their remarkable life story in new TED talk

If you think listening to a paralyzed, blind man discuss his life does not sound uplifting, meet Mark Pollock. Social psychologist Amy Cuddy, whose TED talk about body language has nearly 15 million views, describes the new talk by Pollock and his partner, human rights lawyer, Simone George, as “the most powerful, moving talk I have ever seen at TED.”

Dr. Monica Perez’s Team Shows First Evidence of Using Cortical Targets to Improve Motor...

Published: June 13, 2017

Monica A. Perez, P.T., Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Neurological Surgery and The Miami Project, and colleagues, recently published A novel cortical target to enhance hand motor output in humans with spinal cord injury in the June issue of Brain that provides the first evidence that cortical targets could represent a novel therapeutic site for improving motor function in humans paralyzed by spinal cord injury (SCI).

A main goal of rehabilitation strategies in humans with SCI is to strengthen transmission in spared neural networks. Although neuromodulatory strategies have targeted different sites within the central nervous system to restore motor function following SCI, the role of cortical targets remains poorly understood.

UCLA researcher tackles paralysis with electrical stimulation devices

Published: February 10, 2017

A UCLA professor is helping paralyzed individuals regain use of their limbs through electric stimulation of the spinal cord.

In 2015, Reggie Edgerton, the director of the Neuromuscular Research Laboratory at UCLA, developed a robotic exoskeleton that helped a paralyzed man walk. Though the man is still paralyzed and cannot control the exoskeleton’s movement, Edgerton’s lab plans to do more research to make that happen.

One scientist’s quest to fix broken spinal cords pays off with new hope for...

Published: March 30, 2016

Reggie Edgerton in his lab at UCLALOS ANGELES — There are tiny rat treadmills in the lab. And jars of Nutella, also for the rats. There are video cameras, heaps of electrodes, and instruments for slicing frozen brain tissue.

And in the center of it all: Reggie Edgerton, a 75-year-old physiologist who has spent four decades on a stubborn quest to prove, in the face of scientific ridicule, that severed spinal cords can be jolted back to life — and that paralyzed patients need not be paralyzed forever.

Now, he’s got the data to prove it.