Thursday, August 22, 2019

Tag: google

Google Nest Partners with the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation to Improve Independence for...

Published: July 26, 2019

Google Nest provides up to 100,000 free Google Home Minis to the Reeve Foundation to foster freedom at home across the paralysis community through the #PowerOfVoice

SHORT HILLS, N.J., July 26, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — In celebration of the anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, the leading nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life for people living with paralysis, announced today a partnership with Google Nest to improve independence for the greater paralysis community through Google Nest products powered by the Google Assistant.

Use your voice to access the world with a new Android app

Published: October 2, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Everyone can benefit from hands-free support when using technology, but for the 62 million people in the U.S. with motor and mobility impairments, it can be a vital requirement. For Stefanie Putnam, a quadriplegic and a para-equestrian driver, tasks like taking photos, sending texts and composing emails could be daunting.

Stefanie was one of several people the Google Accessibility team worked with to test early prototypes of a feature which allowed people to control their Android device using voice-only commands. Her feedback—and that of other testers—was instructional in shaping a new product we’ve just released called Voice Access.

Building better maps for the disability community

Published: April 6, 2018

Google and a slew of startups are including accessibility information in apps to help people navigate the world if they use wheelchairs or have other disabilities.

Occupational therapist turned disability rights activist Alanna Raffel has spent her career thinking about accessibility. So for her 30th birthday last year, she turned her passion into action.

Raffel had worked with disabled clients for years in Philadelphia. It wasn’t till late 2016, however, when she became more involved in advocacy, that she learned how difficult it was to find meeting spaces that could accommodate people of varying abilities. It’s particularly challenging in an old city like Philadelphia, where many of the buildings were built more than 200 years before the Americans with Disabilities Act was passed.

App lets quadriplegics use phone without physical assistance

Published: December 16, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Instead of swiping with a finger, the technology lets users control the device with small head movements or voice commands. The technology can help people who are paralyzed or have limited mobility due to neurodegenerative diseases such as MS, ALS or spinal cord injuries.

BALTIMORE (AP) — A day after Oded Ben Dov appeared on Israeli television to promote his video game technology, which allowed players to control their games by moving their heads, a viewer called him with another suggestion for the software.

“I can’t move my arms or legs,” the viewer told him. “Can you make a smartphone that I can use?”

A better world for wheels on Google Maps

Published: September 6, 2017

More than 65 million people worldwide need wheelchairs. I became one of them after an accident eight years ago, and I discovered what it’s like to navigate the world on wheels.

EVA Facial Mouse for mobile devices

Published: August 5, 2017

EVA Facial MouseEVA FACIAL MOUSE is an application developed and promoted by CREA with the support of Fundación Vodafone España.

EVA FACIAL MOUSE is a free and open source application that allows the access to functions of a mobile device by means of tracking the user face captured through the frontal camera. Based on the movement of the face, the app allows the user to control a pointer on the screen (i.e., like a mouse),which provides direct access to most elements of the user interface.

People with amputations, cerebral palsy, spinal cord injury, muscular dystrophy, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or other disabilities may be beneficiaries of this app.

Wheelchair accessible? Just ask Google Maps

Published: December 19, 2016

Google is relying on crowdsourcing to make the world more wheelchair-friendly.

The search giant has launched a new feature through Google Maps that lists whether a location is wheelchair-accessible. Available only in the US to start, the feature relies on users to answer questions about the accessibility of a place they visit.

The new feature could impact millions of people in the United States. There are 2.2 million people in the US who depend on a wheelchair, according to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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