Thursday, April 2, 2020

Tag: Government

Embryonic Stem-Cell Funding Challenge Should Be Dismissed, U.S. Says

Published: June 24, 2011

A challenge to funding of human embryonic stem-cell studies should be dismissed after an appeals court found the government-backed research to be lawful, the Obama administration said.

The Justice Department in a filing today urged U.S. District Judge Royce Lamberth to end a lawsuit that seeks to block the U.S. Health and Human Services Department and the National Institutes of Health from spending federal funds on researching human embryonic stem-cells, known as hESC.

Last year, Lamberth temporarily barred U.S. agencies from funding human embryonic research, finding it likely violated a 1996 law called the Dickey-Wicker Amendment. The law prevents the government from spending money on research where a human embryo is damaged or destroyed.

Rick Hansen set to re-enact his Man in Motion journey

Published: February 2, 2011

Relay involving 7,000 Canadians chosen from 600 communities along the route will begin on 25th anniversary of historic trek

When an exhausted but triumphant Rick Hansen pushed himself into Vancouver on May 22, 1987, after circling the globe in a wheelchair for two years, the miles were all behind him but the journey was just beginning.

Promise of stem cells fulfilled

Published: November 6, 2010

clinical trial in Atlanta, Georgia, is proof that informed public debate is the key to medical advance

IF I’m honest, my first reaction to recent reports that the first human embryonic stem cell trial had begun on spinal patients in Atlanta was one of nonchalance.

Not because of its potential significance to those of us with spinal injuries — desperate for any news of progress — but because of the stop-start nature of the trial, plagued as it has been by legislative and regulatory restraints.

Second anniversary of Michigan embryonic stem cell research vote

Published: October 4, 2010

On Oct 4-6, Michigan welcomes the World Stem Cell Summit. Honored at the conference are Governor Jennifer Granholm and Alfred Taubman. Dr. Joseph Kincaid of Right to Life responds.

On November 4, 2008, Michigan voters, by a narrow margin, passed Proposal 2. Proposal 2 became an amendment to our Constitution that permitted unused human embryos in our in vitro fertilization clinics to be destroyed and their embryonic stem cells (ESC) used for research. The hopes were that this research would lead to cures for diseases devastating our society such as spinal cord injuries, diabetes, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, Parkinsonism, etc.

Governor signs spinal cord injury research bill

Published: October 3, 2010

San Jose, CA (October 3) — Students and teachers rejoiced! Athletes rejoiced! So with parents and advocates of spinal cord injury research, who applauded Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signing into law the bill extending the Roman Reed Spinal Cord Injury Act which was set to expire January 1, 2011.

The bill was sponsored by Assemblyman Alberto Torrico enabling the state to continue California’s spinal cord research fund through the University of California.

U.S. Can Continue Stem-Cell Funding, Court Says

Published: September 29, 2010

Scientists who use embryonic stem cells for research can continue to receive U.S. taxpayer funding while the government challenges a lower-court order that barred federal support, an appeals court said.

The ruling by U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington yesterday puts on hold an order cutting off funding by U.S. District Judge Royce Lamberth, which the government argued would cause irreparable harm to researchers, taxpayers, and scientific progress while the case is appealed.

Appeals court grants stay in stem cell case

Published: September 10, 2010

The federal government will be allowed to keep funding stem cell research — for now.

An Aug. 23 ruling by a U.S. District Court judge barred federal funding of such research until an appeals court granted a stay Thursday that will allow the government to provide money until the case is heard before a federal appeals court, a process that could take several months.

U.S. District Judge Royce Lamberth cited the Dickey-Webber amendment, a federal law that prohibits the use of federal funding for any research in which human embryos may be destroyed.

National Institutes of Health Director Francis S. Collins said in a statement after the initial ruling that the freezing of federal funding greatly threatens current research.

First tests for stem cell therapy are near

Published: August 29, 2010

Even as supporters of human embryonic stem cell research are reeling from last week’s sudden cutoff of federal funding, another portentous landmark is quietly approaching: the world’s first attempt to carefully test the cells in people.

Scientists are poised to inject cells created from embryonic stem cells into some patients with a progressive form of blindness and others with devastating spinal cord injuries. That’s a welcome step for researchers eager to move from the laboratory to the clinic and for patients hoping for cures. But beyond being loathsome to those with moral objections to any research using cells from human embryos, the tests are worrying many proponents: Some argue that the experiments are premature, others question whether they are ethical, and many fear that the trials risk disaster for the field if anything goes awry.

Effect on stem cell ruling on companies unclear

Published: August 25, 2010

(Reuters) – Government officials say they will appeal a U.S. District Court injunction that stops new federal funding of human embryonic stem cell research.

The ruling has no direct effect on researchers or companies working with private funds, but government funding often kick-starts the most basic, and risky biological work.

Scientists are working to use them to repair severed spinal cords, regenerate brain cells lost in Parkinson’s disease and restore the tissue destroyed by juvenile diabetes.

Stem cell reversal: Ill Americans deserve better

Published: August 24, 2010

District court judge blocks federal funding for embryonic stem cell research

Just when you thought embryonic stem cell research would begin to show whether regenerating damaged cells would allow spinal cord injury victims to walk again or help repair damaged hearts, a federal district court judge has ordered it to stop.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!