Thursday, November 14, 2019

Tag: Health & Fitness

Ten interesting things you may not know about wheelchair basketball

Published: August 19, 2019

The worldwide popularity of adaptive sports is on the up and we are certainly seeing the positive consequences of major sporting events, such as the Olympics and the Commonwealth Games, opening their doors to athletes with disabilities for the first time many decades ago.

A lot has changed since the inaugural Paralympic Games in Rome in 1960, which was the first time that the event allowed disabled athletes to compete who were not war veterans. Since then, inclusivity has constantly risen in the sporting world, and stigmas related to disability have dramatically reduced throughout all aspects of life.

Partnership key to fitness success for people with spinal cord injury

Published: July 9, 2019

UBC research shows personal input and collaboration provide positive results

New co-created research at UBC’s Okanagan campus has resulted in ground-breaking increases in physical activity and fitness for those living with spinal cord injury (SCI).

NextStep Fitness

Published: April 8, 2017
NextStepFitness.org

NextStep is an internationally recognized non-profit that makes life-changing rehab and fitness accessible and affordable to individuals living with paralysis. Today, most of these individuals are deprived of the resources they desperately need to live long, healthy and happy lives. NextStep’s goal is to open NextStep paralysis recovery centers across the country to ensure an improved quality-of-life and a continuum of care for this underserved population. By offering the state-of-the-art equipment, world class certified trainers, cutting edge therapies; our centers provide the best chance for recovery, health, and independence.

NextStep Locations: Los Angeles, Orlando, Atlanta, and Kansas City

What People Don’t Know About Staying Fit In a Wheelchair

Published: July 25, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

wheelchair-fitness“If I get too heavy, I can’t do basic things like shower or get myself in and out of my bed or car.”

I’m 31 years old, and I’ve been using a wheelchair since the age of five due to a spinal cord injury that left me paralyzed from the waist down. Growing up overly aware of my lack of control of my lower body and in a family that’s battled weight issues, I was concerned about staying fit from a young age. For me, it’s always been about so much more than vanity—people in wheelchairs need to maintain a healthy weight in order to stay independent.

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