Saturday, January 18, 2020

Tag: Mobility

WHEELCHAIR GAMES ATHLETES SAY

Published: April 16, 2004

After watching a quadriplegic man compete at a water skiing event several years ago, Tim Giroux of Flint knew there were very few limits to what he could do.

“That was the big event for me that opened my eyes,” said Giroux, who has a spinal cord injury and uses a wheelchair. “I realized I can still do just about anything I really want to.”

Trojans Swim with Mike

Published: April 13, 2004

In 1981, a benefit for injured USC swimming star Mike Nyeholt turned into an annual event for athletes.

As they were getting ready to leave the beach, he wanted to take a final dip into the ocean. Waist-deep in the water, he dove in and suddenly felt as if he had been punched in the face. He tried to stand, but nothing happened.

Soldiers connect with veterans

Published: April 6, 2004

Employees from Headquarters, TRADOC visit the local VA Hospital spinal cord unit for an afternoon of games, fun

First-time visitors to the Hampton VA Medical Center’s Spinal Cord Injury Unit rarely know what to expect. So, they brace themselves for the worst: that unmistakable hospital smell, dark corridors, and desperate faces.

Rehabilitation Process of Persons With Spinal Cord Injury

Published: April 4, 2004

Rehabilitation Process of Persons With Spinal Cord Injury

Spinal cord injury (SCI) can occur at any time to any individual. Acute SCI is an unexpected event that can result from a fall or a car accident, no matter how minor. It can occur from diving into too shallow water, or it can occur because of a wrong move during a sports event, and it often persists for the lifetime of the person who acquires it. Young, Burns, Bowen, and McCutchen (1982) point out that most spinal cord injuries occur predominantly in younger people, with the most common age being 19, and that fifty percent of all injuries occur to individuals under the age of 25. Though young age is not a determining factor in acquiring an SCI. It can also occur during birth, or from a fall at age one-hundred and one.

Disabilities on Ice

Published: March 24, 2004

Daily News reporter Ann Potempa can be reached at 257-4581 – Daily News

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ON a Friday night, when much of Anchorage was meeting friends for a late-night drink or watching the final credits of a movie, a group of athletes met on the ice in Eagle River.

Neural Engineering’s Image Problem

Published: March 24, 2004

Newswise — Jennifer French, who was paralyzed from the waist down in 1998 as a result of a snowboarding accident, has a new mission. Standing up? Walking? No–been there, done that. With the help of electronics implanted in her legs and lower torso, she can already stand up out of her wheelchair and even move around using a walker. But now she’s taken on a different sort of challenge: motivating others with neurological injuries and their caregivers to consider implanted devices. It’s a tougher sell than you might think.

Disabilities on Ice

Published: March 23, 2004

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ON a Friday night, when much of Anchorage was meeting friends for a late-night drink or watching the final credits of a movie, a group of athletes met on the ice in Eagle River.

Ice time for this coed team at the McDonald Memorial Center was less than ideal. But that was the least of the obstacles it had to overcome to play a round of hockey.

Breakthrough Device for Spinal Cord Injury Patients

Published: March 23, 2004

LITTLETON, CO — (MARKET WIRE) — 03/23/2004 — Zynex Medical Holdings, Inc. (OTC BB: ZYNX) has added a revolutionary new mode to their NeuroMove™ for spinal cord injury patients. Zynex’s patent pending product, the NeuroMove™, has been used by numerous stroke victims since late 2003. The new mode is five times as sensitive as the stroke recovery mode enabling the identification of minute traces of brain to muscle activity.

The Marathon Miracle

Published: March 19, 2004

BOSTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–March 19, 2004–This April, a young man named Jack Shadduck plans to bicycle 26.2 miles–completing the same distance as the thousands of runners of the Boston Marathon. Why is it a miracle? Because Jack is paralyzed from the neck down.

Shooting for the STARZ

Published: March 10, 2004

Roll! Shoot! Score! By Jill Cueni-Cohen

Ordinary basketball takes on a whole new dimension when it’s played by teams in wheelchairs.

“Wheelchair basketball really is a game of inches,” said Diana Helt, 19, as she strapped herself into a wheelchair built specifically for playing basketball. The chair lacks handles and is able to make hairpin turns and quick stops.

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