Sunday, September 15, 2019

Tag: Craig H. Neilsen Foundation

Sex, Love and Intimacy After Spinal Cord Injury – Mt. Sinai Hospital

Published: February 1, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Sex, Love and Intimacy After Spinal Cord Injury is a series of professionally developed videos that explore the topic of post spinal cord injury sex.

This video project was created through a grant from the Craig H. Neilsen Foundation and support from community partners to provide more educational resources about sex, sexuality and intimacy after spinal cord injury. These videos were shot during a one day medical professionals’ conference and a two day consumer conference at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York City. They consist of personal interviews, as well as some positioning devices and techniques to try if you are someone living with a spinal cord injury or the partner of someone living with a spinal cord injury.

University of Calgary studying relationships built during spinal cord injury rehab

Published: January 27, 2019

A new University of Calgary study looks to understand the relationship between those who survive spinal injuries and the people who care for them.

The University of Calgary is conducting a new study that takes a closer look at the relationship between spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors and their caregivers.

The study is financed by the Craig H. Neilsen Foundation and both the University of Calgary and the University of Alberta are collecting data.

Case Western Reserve Researchers Restore Breathing and Partial Forelimb Function in Rats with Chronic...

Published: November 27, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Promising results provide hope for humans suffering from chronic paralysis

Millions of people worldwide are living with chronic spinal cord injuries, with 250,000 to 500,000 new cases each year—most from vehicle crashes or falls. The most severe spinal cord injuries completely paralyze their victims and more than half impair a person’s ability to breathe. Now, a breakthrough study published in Nature Communications has demonstrated, in animal models of chronic injury, that long-term, devastating effects of spinal cord trauma on breathing and limb function may be reversible.

Feinstein Institute study sheds light on combating infections tied to spinal cord injury

Published: January 12, 2018

Dr. Ona E. Bloom, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research , associate professor has uncovered that white blood cell genes are present at different levels in people with spinal cord injury.

These findings, published yesterday online in the “Journal of Neurotrauma,” are a first step to understanding and developing better interventions for infections in people with spinal cord injury, which is the leading cause of death in these individuals.

Chesapeake Region Accessible Boating Clinic/Regatta for Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: June 1, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,


Chesapeake Region Accessible Boating is dedicated to bringing the thrill and freedom of sailing to persons with different abilities, wounded warriors, and disadvantaged youth.

Man moves paralyzed legs using device that stimulates spinal cord

Published: April 3, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

ROCHESTER, Minn. – Mayo Clinic researchers used electrical stimulation on the spinal cord and intense physical therapy to help a man intentionally move his paralyzed legs, stand and make steplike motions for the first time in three years.

The case, the result of collaboration with UCLA researchers, appears today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Researchers say these results offer further evidence that a combination of this technology and rehabilitation may help patients with spinal cord injuries regain control over previously paralyzed movements, such as steplike actions, balance control and standing.

Brain-computer interface advance allows fast, accurate typing by people with paralysis

Published: February 21, 2017

In a Stanford-led research report, three participants with movement impairment controlled an onscreen cursor simply by imagining their own hand movements.

A clinical research publication led by Stanford University investigators has demonstrated that a brain-to-computer hookup can enable people with paralysis to type via direct brain control at the highest speeds and accuracy levels reported to date.

New Mobile App Promotes Fitness for People with Spinal Cord Injury

Published: February 10, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Shepherd Center, in collaboration with MobileSmith, has developed a mobile app called SCI-Ex to promote fitness for people with spinal cord injury (SCI). The app, which is available for both Apple and Android devices, provides video demonstrations with detailed descriptions of proper equipment use, accurate transfer methods and adaptive exercise techniques.

“There is some information online and still photos of exercises, but until now, there have not been any user-friendly, in-depth videos of exercises for people with spinal cord injury,” said Nicholas Evans, one of the lead exercise specialists at Shepherd Center. “SCI-Ex doesn’t just present exercises, but incorporates the proper techniques to use assistive devices, proper transferring methods, and how to manage those methods and/or devices in a facility.”

Grant Awarded to Spot Urinary Tract Infections among Spinal Cord Injury Patients

Published: November 16, 2016

suzanne-groah-md-msphWASHINGTON, D.C. (November 16, 2016) — Suzanne Groah, MD, MSPH, has been awarded a $500,000 grant by the Craig H. Neilsen Foundation to support screening for urinary tract infections (UTIs) among patients with spinal cord injuries at MedStar National Rehabilitation Network.

“Urinary tract infection is the most common bacterial infection seen in the outpatient setting and the most common healthcare-associated infection, making it a major worldwide public health problem,” said Dr. Groah. In addition, spinal cord injury patients are at high risk for recurrent UTI, which is known to cause significant pain and discomfort; however, mobility limitations often create barriers to these patients receiving comprehensive care.

Ohio State Scientists Explain How Gut Microbes Change After Spinal Cord Injury

Published: October 17, 2016

pop-phillipCOLUMBUS, Ohio – The community of bacteria that live in our intestines, also called the “gut microbiome,” is important to normal intestinal function. Knowing that spinal cord injuries often negatively affect the gut’s ability to do its job, researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center showed that spinal cord injury causes profound changes in the gut microbiota. They also showed that feeding mice probiotics after a spinal cord injury confers neuroprotection and improves functional recovery.

The findings are published online today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

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