Friday, April 23, 2021

Tag: olfactory ensheathing cells

Could nose cells treat spinal cord injuries?

Scientists developing robust method to treat spinal cord injuries using nose cells Researchers have designed a new way to grow nose cells in the lab heralding hope for sufferers of spinal cord injuries, including those...

Scientists discover new way to help nerve regeneration in spinal cord injury

There is currently no cure for spinal cord injury or treatment to help nerve regeneration so therapies offering intervention are limited. People with severe spinal cord injuries can remain paralysed for life and this...
Professor Alan Mackay-Sim

The future of stem cells: tackling hype versus hope

Controversy surrounds the link between Australian of the Year Alan Mackay Sim’s research and a Polish team who restored mobility for a paraplegic man. For many people suffering from disabling conditions, such as Parkinson’s disease,...

Cure for spinal cord injuries nose ahead with nasal cell transplants

QUEENSLAND researchers are a step closer to human trials of a potential treatment for spinal cord injuries involving transplants of nasal cells combined with physiotherapy. Griffith University neuroscientist James St John said he hoped to...

Improving cell transplantation after spinal cord injury: When, where and how?

Spinal cord injuries are mostly caused by trauma, often incurred in road traffic or sporting incidents, often with devastating and irreversible consequences, and unfortunately having a relatively high prevalence (250,000 patients in the USA;...

Olfactory ensheathing cells for spinal cord repair: crucial differences between subpopulations of the glia

Is repairing the injured spinal cord by olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation possible? A recent human trial in which a paralysed man regained some function after transplantation of partially purified OECs suggests that this therapy may be a successful approach.

Using Transplanted Olfactory Mucosa Cells in Spinal Cord Injury Surgeries

Patients treated for spinal cord injury (SCI) using olfactory mucosa lamina propria (OLP) transplants demonstrated modest improvements, according to research published in Cell Transplantation.

Olfactory cells transplanted to treat spinal cord injury

Three years after they treated patients with spinal cord injury in a randomized clinical trial with transplanted cells from the patients' olfactory mucosa (nasal cavities) to build a 'bridge' to span the gap between...