Thursday, October 22, 2020

Tag: Physical Therapist

For more than 30 years, A-1 Scuba and Craig Hospital have partnered to provide...

Published: January 10, 2018

Deep beneath the surface of a crystal blue pool or a dark green ocean, differences tend to fade. As a former physical therapist at Craig Hospital of Englewood and longtime scuba diver, Scott Taylor knows this better than most.

“Water is the great equalizer,” he frequently says.

He and his wife, Lynn, own and operate A-1 Scuba and Travel Aquatics Center in Littleton, a business Lynn’s father opened more than 58 years ago.

BOOK: I’m Not Broken

Published: October 15, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:
book-cover-im-not-broken
I’m Not Broken

Twenty-something Samantha McCormick wakes up in the hospital to learn she has a spinal cord injury from a car accident, and she’s paralyzed from the waist down. It doesn’t take her long to begin to master the new physical challenges in her life. But she’s haunted by the blurred lines between dreams and a fractured reality full of broken memories of the accident. Brian Haines is the physical therapist assigned to Sam to help her regain her independence and sense of self. He’s devoted to his task, but his commitment to working with Sam eventually transitions from dedication to something more personal. Sam is thrilled and flattered by the attention. Yet, all the while she can’t help but think she might be missing important memories and pieces of information, and she worries her new life is little more than a fragile house of cards.

Spinal cord injury patients may benefit from using exoskeleton earlier in treatment

Published: August 3, 2016

exoskeleton-studyCumming School study first in Canada to examine whether using robotic device immediately following injuries promotes recovery

Researchers from the University of Calgary’s Cumming School of Medicine are the first in Canada to examine the benefits of using an exoskeleton robotic device to rehabilitate patients with spinal cord injuries (SCI) in the days and weeks following their injury.

POSTURAL DRAINAGE

Published: June 3, 2006

To drain the middle and lower portions of your lungs, you should be positioned with your chest above your head. Possible techniques to achieve this position are:

* If a hospital bed is available, put in Trendelenburg position (head lower than feet)
* Place 3-5 wood blocks, that are 2 inches by 4 inches, in a stack that is 5 inches high, under the foot of a regular bed. Blocks should have indentations or a 1 inch rim on top so that the bed does not slip
* Stack 18-20 inches of pillow under hips.
* Place on a Tilt Table, with head lower than feet.
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