Thursday, January 23, 2020

Tag: Quality Of Life

Treatment and Cure Research

Published: September 13, 2003

Summary of Basic Science Research

As you can see by the facts detailed above, the problem of CNS response to injury is incredibly complex. No one theory or approach will overcome all of the effects of SCI, and many scientists now believe that the “cure” will not be found in a single approach, but rather in a combination of techniques. Consequently, it is important for all possible research areas to be addressed so our overall knowledge about how the system works may eventually lead to a cure for SCI.

Associations & Orgs

Published: September 8, 2003

American Paraplegia Society
Dedicated to improving the quality of medical care delivered to persons with SCI. Promotes research and the review of scientific findings.

American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA)
Group of medical and other professionals engaged in treatment of spinal cord injury: to promote and establish standards for health care, education, to foster research and to facilitate communication between members.

International Orgs

Published: September 8, 2003

Australasian Spinal Research Trust (Australia)
The Trust is dedicated to finding a cure for paralysis via promotion and funding of research and dissemination of information about developments in research.

Canadian & American Spinal Research Organization (Canada)
An alliance of the CSRO and ASRO to help us maximize research and the fund raising efforts. Dedicated to the improvement of the physical quality of life for persons with a spinal cord injury through targeted medical & scientific research.

Life Satisfaction Among Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: July 12, 2000

Every year, approximately 10,000 persons in the United States, typically young adults (New Mobility, 1996), seriously injure their spinal cords and become permanently paralyzed. Through advances in medical treatment, most persons survive a spinal cord injury and live two or more decades post-injury. However, researchers have only recently begun to study the long-term psychosocial implications of a spinal cord injury (Whiteneck, Charlifue, Frankel, et al., 1992). One such psychosocial implication is the person’s perceived satisfaction with the quality of his or her life following such an injury. This study examined factors associated with the life satisfaction of persons with a spinal cord injury including biological, personal, and social factors.

A Comparison Between People with Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: February 16, 2000

Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a severe traumatic Disability that occurs suddenly and affects both sensory and Motor functions. According to the National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center 1999), there are about 203,000 persons in the U.S. who have sustained a spinal cord injury and approximately 10,000 new injuries occurr each year. Although medical advances have increased the life expectancies of people with SCI, there has been a limited amount of research addressing life satisfaction in people with SCI (Krause, 1992).

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