Monday, December 9, 2019

Tag: SCI

5 key notes on cervical spinal cord injury treatment delays

Published: July 8, 2015

A new study published in Spine examines the reasons for treating cervical spinal cord injury late.

The researchers examined 2,636 patients for the study. They used the National Trauma Data Bank Research Data Set to gather information. There were 803 patients with complete spinal cord injury, 950 with incomplete spinal cord injury and 883 with central spinal cord injury.

Chris Kluwe Rolls a Mile in Someone Else’s Wheels

Published: April 12, 2013

Minnesota Viking Chris Kluwe spends a day in a wheelchair to support our efforts to pass the Jablonski Rodreick SCI TBI Research Bill.

Spinal cord researchers to benefit from $20 M investment from Rick Hansen Foundation

Published: April 12, 2013

Rick Hansen FoundationSpinal cord injury research at the University of British Columbia and Vancouver Coastal Health will be accelerated by a 10-year, $20 million contribution from the Rick Hansen Foundation.

The International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (ICORD), a UBC-VCH research centre, will share the funds with the Rick Hansen Institute, which coordinates and assists spinal cord injury researchers around the world.

Acorda Wins $2.67M Army Contract for Spinal Cord Injury Drug Trial

Published: January 24, 2013

Acorda Therapeutics said today it won a $2.67 million contract from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command (USAMRMC) to support development of AC105 as a treatment for acute spinal cord injury (SCI).

The contract will help fund a Phase II clinical trial designed primarily to assess the safety and tolerability of AC105 in patients with acute SCI. The company plans to open enrollment for this study in the first half of this year.

Miami Project To Cure Paralysis Doctors Perform First Schwann Cell Transplant For Spinal Cord...

Published: January 23, 2013

miami-project-cure-for-paralysis-logoJanuary 23, 2013 – Doctors at The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, a Center of Excellence at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, performed the first-ever Food and Drug Administration approved Schwann cell transplantation in a patient with a new spinal cord injury. The procedure, performed at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center, is a Phase 1 clinical trial designed to evaluate the safety and feasibility of transplanting the patient’s own Schwann cells.

“This historic clinical trial represents a giant step forward in a field of medicine where each tangible step has tremendous value. This trial, and these first patients in this trial specifically, are extremely important to our mission of curing paralysis,” said neurosurgeon Barth Green, M.D., Co-Founder and Chairman of The Miami Project, and Professor and Chair of Neurological Surgery.

The Race To Cure Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: January 15, 2013

A Big Opportunity – For Everyone

Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) refers to an injury to the spinal cord that is caused by direct trauma or secondary damage to the surrounding bone, tissue, or blood vessels. Classification of the extent of the injury is based on neurological responses, touch and pinprick sensations tested in each dermatome (an area of the skin supplied by a single spinal nerve), and strength of ten key muscles on each side of the body, including the hip flexion (L2), shoulder shrug (C4), elbow flexion (C5), wrist extension (C6), and elbow extension (C7). The four categories of SCI classification and their respective percent of the market are: Complete Tetraplegia (16%), Incomplete Tetraplegia (41%), Complete Paraplegia (22%), and Incomplete Paraplegia (21%)

Neuralstem Receives FDA Approval To Commence Spinal Cord Injury Trial

Published: January 14, 2013

NEURALSTEM, INC. LOGONSI-566 to be tested in patients with chronic spinal cord injury

ROCKVILLE, Md., Jan. 14, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Neuralstem, Inc. (NYSE MKT: CUR) announced that it received approval from the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to commence a Phase I safety trial of its lead cell therapy candidate, NSI-566, in chronic spinal cord injury patients. This open-label, multi-site study, will enroll up to eight patients with thoracic spinal cord injuries (T2-T12), who have an American Spinal Injury Association (AIS) A level of impairment,  between one and two years after injury. AIS A impairment refers to a patient with no motor or sensory function in the relevant segments at and below the injury, and is considered to be complete paralysis.

Systemic hypothermia in acute cervical spinal cord injury: a case-controlled study

Published: December 18, 2012

Systemic hypothermia remains a promising neuroprotective strategy. There has been recent interest in its use in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). In this article, we describe our extended single center experience using intravascular hypothermia for the treatment of cervical SCI.

Spinal Cord Injuries & Incontinence

Published: December 12, 2012

spinal_mapThis week’s Wee Answer Wednesday will be squarely focused on incontinence after a spinal cord injury. In the immediate aftermath of a spinal cord injury, there’s a lot to take in. Your life has changed in so many ways that it can be a challenge to get a handle on all the information coming your way. Some problems are bigger than others. In a recent survey of paralyzed veterans, incontinence was identified as the #2 most important issue for those in wheelchairs.

So whether you’re new to the issue or an old hat at managing your incontinence, here are some of the most common incontinence questions men ask after a spinal cord injury.

UofL research shows that patients benefit from spinal cord rehab network, locomotor training

Published: September 5, 2012

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (Sept. 5, 2012) — Research studies from teams headed by a University of Louisville/Frazier Rehab Institute neuroscientist published online this week demonstrate for the first time that innovative rehabilitative treatments for individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI) can lead to significant functional improvements in patients and a higher quality of life.

Eleven studies published in the September issue of the “Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation” conclude that establishing a network of rehab centers for SCI that standardizes treatment can lead to significant functional improvements for chronically injured patients.

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