Wednesday, February 26, 2020

Tag: Shepherd Center

Paralyzed in 2014 crash that killed her beloved husband, Robinette Tilley stays in family...

Published: February 10, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Robinette Tilley is the boss. The fact that she rides a wheelchair now instead of a motorcycle hasn’t changed that.

Tilley was in her customary spot, sitting behind her husband, Don, on his Harley-Davidson when the motorcycle crashed on Aug. 29, 2014 near Mile Post 394 on the Blue Ridge Parkway in Buncombe County. Don, 78, was killed in the wreck.

A shattered right arm, broken neck and pelvis, and seriously damaged spinal cord sent Robinette to six different hospitals in six months. Doctors told Tilley’s family she would never return home.

Love – and a Little Help from New Friends – Keeps School Sweethearts’ Wedding...

Published: March 14, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , ,

Anna Claire Stokes had a wedding to coordinate. Thanks to her new Shepherd Center family, no spinal cord injury was going to derail her plans.

New Mobile App Promotes Fitness for People with Spinal Cord Injury

Published: February 10, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Shepherd Center, in collaboration with MobileSmith, has developed a mobile app called SCI-Ex to promote fitness for people with spinal cord injury (SCI). The app, which is available for both Apple and Android devices, provides video demonstrations with detailed descriptions of proper equipment use, accurate transfer methods and adaptive exercise techniques.

“There is some information online and still photos of exercises, but until now, there have not been any user-friendly, in-depth videos of exercises for people with spinal cord injury,” said Nicholas Evans, one of the lead exercise specialists at Shepherd Center. “SCI-Ex doesn’t just present exercises, but incorporates the proper techniques to use assistive devices, proper transferring methods, and how to manage those methods and/or devices in a facility.”

Parenting with a Spinal Cord Injury Presents Challenges and Opportunities

Published: November 13, 2015

Jennifer SextonHere is a list of positive things that can come from the experience.

Having a spinal cord injury affects everyone in the family. People who are newly injured often fear being unable to be a good parent.

Though being a parent with a spinal cord injury is challenging, there are some positive things that can result for you and your child.

WPI student begins challenging journey after spinal cord injury

Published: June 13, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Jared Grie The first entry on the grierstrong.com blog set a remarkably honest tone for what will likely be a lifelong journey for Worcester Polytechnic Institute freshman Jared Grier and his family.

Written by his stepmother, Susan Okie, just hours after the 19-year-old mechanical engineering student fell from a tree at Worcester’s Institute Park, the words were candid, realistic and inclusive in describing the accident that severely injured Mr. Grier’s spinal cord, and, in almost an instant, made him a quadriplegic.

Experimental Drug Being Tested at Shepherd Center May Improve Mobility after Spinal Cord Injury

Published: August 25, 2014

800_spineandbodyillustration-shepherdcenter-horizontalOnly hours after a traumatic spinal cord injury, when the life-and-death moments have passed and ongoing challenges are just coming into focus, some patients are receiving an experimental drug that may change their lives.

The investigational medication, called SUN13837, is given intravenously within 12 hours of a traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and then daily for 28 days. It is a fat-soluble molecule that may protect damaged neurons and even promote new nerve growth, preventing some loss of function.

Young wrestler battles back after spinal cord injury

Published: March 17, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Hunter GarstinHunter Garstin, 15, shows remarkable improvement 100 days after getting hurt during a match

ATLANTA — If Hunter Garstin gets the chance to wrestle again — if his body and his parents cooperate — he will.

But the 15-year-old Franklin, Ga. resident realizes that’s a long way off.

The Independence High School freshman suffered a spinal cord injury at a wrestling tournament 100 days ago. He was initially paralyzed from the neck down, but he has regained full use of his arms and partial use of his hands. He can manually operate a wheelchair and is working toward walking again.

Safe Swimming: Lives Change Forever With One Bad Dive

Published: May 13, 2013

Sandra Jones helps her son Chase out of his wheelchairAn unfamiliar, unlit pool and a split-second decision to dive.

That tragic combination changed Chase Jones’ life forever.

The 28-year-old University of Georgia graduate broke three vertebrae in his neck, leaving him largely paralyzed from the shoulders down.

“This is something I’m still coming to terms with in some way every day,” said Jones, who worked as a governmental affairs officer for the Georgia Public Safety Training Center before his accident last August.

“Once upon a time, I could wake up and be ready to go to work in 30 minutes,” said Jones, who moved back into his parents’ ranch-style home in Carrollton, Ga. “Now it easily takes an hour and a half.”

Shepherd Center’s therapy dogs are more than canine companions

Published: November 13, 2012

Christian Maynard was just being a kid, a normal teenager having a good time, when it happened. In a flash. So fast he didn’t know what hit him.

He was riding a motorcycle, towing a dune buggy loaded with friends, when he hit some gravel and flipped. The dune buggy ran right over him, breaking vertebrae in his neck and back.

He couldn’t move. Friends called for help. Ten days later he was at the Shepherd Center, a rehabilitation hospital in Atlanta.

Jay Ruckelshaus working toward ‘a whole new life’ after accident

Published: April 13, 2012

John and Mary Ruckelshaus know the feeling of powerlessness.

First, their oldest son, Drew, and daughter, Maggie — diagnosed with congenital glaucoma as babies — went through 20 surgeries each to prevent blindness.

Then, at age 9, Drew was diagnosed with leukemia and suffered through six months of chemotherapy and five years of medication.

But now the family faces its longest, most difficult battle.

It involves their youngest son, 19-year-old Jay, a lanky 6-foot-5 scholar-athlete who was blessed with abundant talents.

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