Friday, September 18, 2020

Tag: Ventilator

Determined to walk

Published: November 22, 2004

Paralyzed Delray Beach man working make his wheelchair history

by Dale M. King

At the youthful age of 25, Kevin Mullin of Delray Beach knows how quickly life’s plan can change.

About a year ago, fresh out of college, the strapping and athletic Mullin was about to launch a career as a headhunter.

Reeve Courageously Backed Stem Cell Research/ CureParalysisNow mourns the loss of THE GREATEST SCI...

Published: October 10, 2004

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Christopher Reeve, the paralyzed actor who died nine years after a riding accident, worked tirelessly to promote medical advances, especially the controversial stem cell research that has emerged as a campaign issue this year.

`Superman’ star became real-life fighter for spinal cord research

Published: October 10, 2004

MOUNT KISCO, N.Y. – Christopher Reeve, the chiseled, strapping “Superman” of celluloid who became another kind of hero as a force for spinal cord research after a devastating horse-riding accident, has died at 52.

Reeve, a quadriplegic for the last nine years of his life who vowed that he would one day walk again, died Sunday of complications from an infection caused by a bedsore.

D.C. Jail Stay Ends in Death For Quadriplegic Md. Man

Published: September 30, 2004

Care Provided by Hospital, Corrections Dept. in Question

By Henri E. Cauvin – Washington Post Staff Writer

Jonathan Magbie, a 27-year-old Mitchellville man, was sent to jail in the District last week for 10 days for marijuana possession.

He never made it home.

Do people with SCI die sooner?

Published: September 13, 2004

Yes, before World War II, most people who sustained SCI died within weeks of their injury due to urinary dysfunction, respiratory infection or pressure sores. With the advent of modern antibiotics, modern materials such as plastics and latex, and better procedures for dealing with everyday issues of living with SCI, many people approach the life span of non-disabled individuals.

Do people with SCI ever get better?

Published: August 18, 2004

Yes, before World War II, most people who sustained SCI died within weeks of their injury due to urinary dysfunction, respiratory infection or pressure sores. With the advent of modern antibiotics, modern materials such as plastics and latex, and better procedures for dealing with everyday issues of living with SCI, many people approach the life span of non-disabled individuals. Interestingly, other than level of injury, the type of rehabilitation facility used is the greatest indicator of long-term survival.

How is acute spinal cord injury treated?

Published: June 15, 2004

Acute spinal cord injury refers to hours or days after spinal cord injury during which continued deterioration or tissue damage may occur. Shortly after an injury, the spinal cord often does not appear to be severely damaged even though there may be immediate functional loss. The injury initiates a cascade of chemical and cellular responses that contribute to further tissue damage, including inflammation, free radicals, and swelling (edema). The spinal cord may be compressed during this period.

Second chance at life

Published: May 30, 2004

On a random Saturday morning in 2000, Jim Beckley was sitting down with his wife Ellen discussing how exhausted he had been at his engineer job.

He had been working close to 80 hours a week and this was his first Saturday in months that he had off. Jim told his wife, “Honey, I need to slow down, but I don’t know how.”

Benefit to aid infant with rare disease

Published: May 13, 2004

WALLINGFORD — Jonathan Narducci was born a happy and healthy baby, but after seven months all that changed in an instant.

Last May, Paul Narducci picked up his son from day care and found Jonathan’s body limp with labored breathing. Since then, Paul and Bonnie Narducci have spent every day by their son’s side praying for his recovery and taking things one day at a time.

A laurel wreath for Jack

Published: April 20, 2004

Paralyzed teen finished marathon on stationary bike

The 26-mile Boston Marathon is considered the granddaddy of all marathons where there are hundreds of stories of personal triumphs. A Braintree teen, who is paralyzed from the neck down, is celebrating the completion of his own marathon: pedaling a stationary bike for the equivalent of 26 miles.