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Spinal Cord Injury Information

Information on Spinal Cord Injury Research, Treatments, Medicines and Quality of Life

Spasticity : two potential therapeutic avenues

Published: March 17, 2016

neurone_webFollowing spinal cord injury, most patients experience an exaggeration of muscle tone called spasticity, which frequently leads to physical disability.

A team at the Institut de Neurosciences de la Timone (CNRS/Aix-Marseille Université) has just identified one of the molecular mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon. It has also proposed two therapeutic solutions that have proved conclusive in animals, one of which will be tested during phase II clinical trials as early as this year. This work, published in Nature Medicineon 14 March 2016, thus opens new therapeutic avenues to reduce this physical disability.

Twelve million people throughout the world suffer from a motor disorder called spasticity. Continue Reading »

Autonomic hyperreflexia after spinal cord injury managed successfully with intravenous lidocaine: a case report

Published: March 15, 2016

Abstract

Background
Some paraplegic patients may wish undergo some surgical procedures, like urological procedures, without anesthesia. However, these patients can develop autonomic hyperreflexia if cystoscopy is performed without anesthesia.

Case presentation
We present a case of severe autonomic hyperreflexia in a 44-year-old male with spinal cord injury at the level of T4 during urologic procedure under sedation and analgesia successfully treated with intravenous lidocaine. Continue Reading »

Bioelectronic devices to improve quality of life after SCI

Published: March 3, 2016

Bioelectronic devices that record and stimulate the brain, spinal cord or peripheral nerves have potential to dramatically improve function after injury or disease. Continue Reading »

Early Rehab May Help Spinal Cord Injury Patients

Published: February 19, 2016

Early Rehab May Help Spinal Cord Injury Patients(HealthDay News) — Beginning rehabilitation soon after a spinal cord injury seems to lead to improvements in functioning for patients, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 4,000 people in the United States who suffered a spinal cord injury between 2000 and 2014. The patients’ average age was about 41 and the average time to start rehabilitation was 19 days.

Early rehabilitation was associated with better physical functioning when patients left the hospital and during the following year. Continue Reading »

Long-term change in respiratory function following spinal cord injury

Published: January 12, 2016

Study design: Retrospective study.

Objectives: To model the effect of time since injury on longitudinal respiratory function measures in spinal cord injured-individuals and to investigate the effect of patient characteristics.

Setting: A total of 173 people who sustained a spinal cord injury between 1966 and April 2013 and who had previously participated in research or who underwent clinically indicated outpatient respiratory function tests at the Austin Hospital in Melbourne, Australia, were included in the study. At least two measurements over time were available for analysis in 59 patients. Continue Reading »

Breaking Bad: Dozens Of Tourists Suffer Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: January 11, 2016

Too many people are ignoring or simply not understanding the warning signs posted at many public beaches.

Just hours after starting his Hawaii vacation, Todd Duitsman was paralyzed from the neck down.

Duitsman and his family flew from Seattle to Maui in July 2014. They dropped their bags at their condo, got a bite to eat and drove straight to Makena’s Big Beach.

An hour later, Duitsman was body surfing in the shore break. Continue Reading »

Spinal injuries need the most care

Published: December 26, 2015

In many road traffic accidents, the cervical spine (neck region) is injured, says spine surgeon V. Vinod.

When the vertebra is disturbed from its original position, it compresses the spinal cord. This renders the person quadriplegic (complete loss of movement of hands and legs and no sensation below the neck), the surgeon explains. The spinal cord is severed only when a bullet or a knife pierces through it. Continue Reading »

The Year in Review: SCI Research Breakthroughs in 2015

Published: December 21, 2015

spinal cord injury year-in-reviewAs we cross the threshold into 2016, we are one step closer to our goal of finding a cure for paralysis.

Moving full speed ahead towards that goal, Conquer Paralysis Now compiled a brief retrospective. 2015 has been an incredible year for spinal cord injury research, with breakthroughs in a variety of potential treatments, on top of important strides made by individuals with SCI. Take a look at some key milestones from this past year and stay tuned for what’s to come in 2016. Happy New Year! Continue Reading »

Stem cell research for spinal cord injury

Published: December 10, 2015

Spinal cord injury (SCI) involves damage to the area that can cause an impairment of loss of muscle control, movement and sensation.  Currently, patients with injury to the spinal cord are managed with physical therapy, occupation therapy and other rehabilitation methods to cope with the physical changes.

However, stem cell research may present a new approach to the management of this patient group, allowing for a potential improvement in the symptoms of the condition, such as incontinence, muscular control and sexual function. Continue Reading »

Exercise following spinal cord injury: physiology to therapy

Published: December 9, 2015

Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) can have catastrophic effects on individuals resulting in loss of physical abilities and independence. Loss of the ability to perform activities of daily living reduces the quality of life. Furthermore, decreased ability to perform physical activities decreases overall fitness and increases the risk of diseases related to sedentary lifestyle. Activity-based restorative therapies (ABRTs) provide an option to help optimize rehabilitation through the restoration of function and the introduction to physical activities via adapted equipment. Continue Reading »