Wednesday, August 5, 2020

Information

Information on Spinal Cord Injury Research, Treatments, Medicines and Quality of Life

Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) With Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: September 8, 2003

What is a urinary tract infection?

When bacteria get into your bladder or kidneys and cause you to have symptoms, you have a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI). It is important to know the difference between an infection and bacteriuria (having bacteria in the urine but no symptoms).

Spinal Cord Injury Facts & Statistics

Published: September 8, 2003

Think you know the facts about spinal cord injuries?  Here is some information that may surprise you.

Who Do Spinal Cord Injuries Affect in the United States?

  • 250,000 Americans are spinal cord injured.
  • 52% of spinal cord injured individuals are considered Paraplegic and 47% quadriplegic.
  • Approximately 11,000 new injuries occur each year.
  • 82% are male.
  • 56% of injuries occur between the ages of 16 and 30.
  • The average age of spinal cord injured person is 31.
  • SCI injuries are most commonly caused by:

Spinal Cord Injury Range Of Motion Exercises

Published: September 8, 2003

If the joints, muscles, ligaments, and tendons are not exercised they will contract/stiffen which will affect your body in many ways. To keep these parts loose Range of Motion exercises are used. These exercises should be performed in a smooth motion as quick motions may damage the joints. As the top of each range is reached the position should be held for a count of 10. Consult your Physical Therapist for range of motion exercises that will best meet your needs.

Craig Hospital to launch experimental spine therapy

Published: March 18, 2003

An experimental therapy that has shown promise for people with spinal cord injuries will soon be available in the metro area. The process, called activated macrophage, has previously only been performed in Israel. That’s where two young people from Colorado received it in an early test involving only 11 subjects. But Craig Hospital in Englewood is waiting for final approval from the Food and Drug Administration to bring activated macrophage to North America.

Spinal cord injuries often missed, mismanaged – In House

Published: November 8, 2002

Despite a growing awareness of the association between automobile accidents and spinal cord injuries, a recent British study shows that nearly one in 10 such injuries is being missed in acute care settings.

Poonnoose and associates conducted a retrospective analysis of records for 569 patients who experienced neurologic deficits as a result of traumatic spinal cord injury. All were admitted to a specialized facility (directly from an emergency unit or from a referring hospital after acute care) for comprehensive management between April 1989 and April 1999. Most injuries were associated with traffic accidents or falls.

Comparison of three wheelchair cushions for effectiveness of pressure relief.

Published: October 13, 2002

This study compared the short-term pressure-relieving ability of the three most commonly prescribed wheelchair cushions (Roho, Jay, Pindot) for a person with SCI. The number of pressure sensors registering at the buttock-cushion interface during wheelchair sitting was measured by the Xsensor Pressure Mapping System after 5 min of sitting. An alternating treatments research design, with an initial baseline and a final treatment phase ending with the most effective cushion for relieving pressure, was used for the clinical evaluation. Measurements were compared using visual inspection and a Wilcoxon signed ranks test.

First-ever guidelines for spinal cord injuries.

Published: October 9, 2002

How spinal cord injuries (SCI) are managed–especially in the critical early stages–has a profound effect on a patient’s outcome. The publication of the first comprehensive SCI, treatment guidelines is an important step in standardizing evidence-based care.

Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) causes devastating neurologic Impairment that often leads to a lifetime of Disability. Each year, there are approximately 11,000 new SCI cases in the United States. (1) About 55% of SCIs occur among people between the ages of 16 and 30. (1)

Management of the spinal cord injured football player.

Published: August 16, 2002

TIERNEY AND COLLEAGUES ASSESSED THE EFFECT OF head position and football equipment (helmet and shoulder pads) on cervical spinal cord space in subjects lying supine on a spine board. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data from 12 subjects were analyzed for sagittal space available for the cord (SAC), sagittal diameter of the spinal cord, and cervical-Thoracic angle. The MRI scans were evaluated midsagittally at each spinal level (C3-C7). The sagittal-diameter spinal canal and spinal cord measurements were taken at the midpoint of the vertebral body, and were traced manually.

Laserpuncture is a New Treatment for SCI?

Published: July 11, 2002

LASERPUNCTURE FOR SPINAL CORD INJURY

Laurance Johnston, Ph.D. Laserpuncture is generating much attention in France and other parts of Europe as an alternative medicine treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI) and related physical disabilities. As the name implies, laserpuncture combines elements of acupuncture and laser therapy, both of which have shown potential for restoring some function after SCI. Albert Bohbot, a charismatic health professional, developed laserpuncture. Early in his career, he became interested in acupuncture’s potential for treating a variety of disorders. With the assistance of scientists at one of France’s leading engineering colleges, Bohbot developed a sophisticated electronic instrument that substituted an infrared laser light beam for acupuncture needles.

Rover in Rehab

Published: April 17, 2002

Therapy dogs work with SCI patients at University of Washington and Harborview Medical Centers

Animal lovers know how comforting a pet can be. Health care providers now recognize that the unconditional love and companionship of a pet can have beneficial effects on the physical and psychological health of the people around them. Increasingly, therapy animals are being used in nursing homes, hospitals, and other therapeutic settings to encourage social interaction and reduce loneliness. At Harborview and the University of Washington Medical Center, therapy dogs have become regular members of the Rehabilitation staff.