Wednesday, February 26, 2020

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Spinal Cord Injury News Articles

ProNeuron to test spinal cord treatment in U.S.

Published: December 8, 2003

NEW YORK (Reuters) – ProNeuron Biotechnologies Inc. on Monday said it was beginning U.S. clinical trials of an ambitious new drug aimed at improving the condition of patients who would otherwise remain paralyzed throughout their lives.

The experimental treatment, ProCord, until now has been tested primarily in Israel, where the small, privately held company is based.

Christopher Reeve, Scientists Share Honor

Published: December 5, 2003

Actor Christopher Reeve, two scientists who discovered an arthritis therapy and a researcher who helped show how cells read their genes have won prestigious medical awards.

The prizes, from the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation, will be awarded Friday in New York. In the last 11 years, 15 scientists who received one have gone on to win a Nobel Prize.

Monkey test offers hope to paralysed

Published: November 29, 2003

sriimg20031126_4491945_0The treated monkeys, which had suffered paralysis in one hand, regained 80 per cent of the movement they had lost.

Up to 12 months of further study is needed to confirm these results and, in particular, to see if there are any serious side effects.

“This is one more step on a very long road,” cautioned Eric Rouiller, professor of neurophysiology at Fribourg University.

New study may explain spinal cord pain

Published: November 18, 2003

BY PAULA BRADY – Staff Reporter
A new study by Yale researchers has found a possible explanation for chronic pain in patients with spinal cord injuries.

Conduction of signals in nerve cells is controlled by molecular “batteries” called sodium channels. The study found that injured nerve cells tend to produce more sodium channels that transmit pain signals to the brain, resulting in chronic pain after injury.

Feeling restored after paralysis

Published: November 17, 2003

_39577635_stem_cells203Scientists say they have successfully restored feeling to patients paralysed for at least two years.

A team from the University of San Paulo in Brazil said 12 out of 30 spinal cord patients responded to electrical stimulation of their paralysed limbs.

The researchers harvested stem cells from the patients’ blood, and reintroduced them into the artery supplying the area which was damaged.

Cell transplants help reverse paralysis

Published: October 24, 2003

Patients are feeling a sensation of hope

Robert Smith, 46, of Harrison Township underwent a Chinese procedure to help him regain movement.

The first American spinal cord patient to undergo a fetal cell transplant procedure — a Harrison Township man paralyzed in a Lake St. Clair diving accident — is regaining some movement and sensation a month after the experimental operation in China.

Paralysed girl’s ‘miracle’ steps

Published: October 6, 2003

_39424266_gemma1_203A teenager who was paralysed from the neck down in a car accident has taken her first steps – despite being told she would never walk again.

Gemma Quinn, 19, from Woolton, Merseyside, suffered severe spinal injuries in a car accident 11 years ago.

She was told she would always be reliant on a Ventilator and a wheelchair.

Gemma said it felt “amazing” to be able to walk again.

How Nerve Cells Grow

Published: July 24, 2003

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDayNews) — Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions have identified a protein that promotes the growth of tentacle-like axons on nerve cells.

The finding could eventually help scientists develop ways to rebuild nerves lost to spinal cord injuries or degenerative conditions such as Huntington’s disease. Researchers have spent decades trying to find signals that guide axons and lets these cell tips reach out to distant targets.

Reeve recovery hopes boosted

Published: December 10, 2002

_38570933_reevechr300Scientists have uncovered evidence that actor Christopher Reeve could make a full recovery from paralysis if his spinal injury can be fixed.

Reeve, the star of the Superman films, was paralysed from the neck down after damaging his spinal cord in a riding fall seven years ago.

But doctors at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, US, have discovered that his brain has maintained a near-normal ability to detect feeling and movement.

Spinal Cord: Heal Thyself

Published: August 29, 2002

Transplanted stem cells can improve Motor skills in injured rats

FRIDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDayNews) — Japanese researchers are reporting yet another advance in the repair of damaged body parts using fetal stem cells.

This one could be big because it involves spinal cords, experts say.

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