Saturday, October 19, 2019

Monthly Archives: April 2015

Spinal Cord Axon Injury Location Determines Neuron’s Regenerative Fate

Published: April 30, 2015

Spinal Cord Axon Injury LocationResearchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report a previously unappreciated phenomenon in which the location of injury to a neuron’s communication wire in the spinal cord — the axon — determines whether the neuron simply stabilizes or attempts to regenerate. The study, published April 30 by Neuron, demonstrates how advances in live-imaging techniques are revealing new insights into the body’s ability to respond to spinal cord injuries.

Father fights for state support for paralysis research

Published: April 29, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Matthew Rodreick and his son, Gabe, work out in space dedicated to Gabe's physical therapy behind his Minneapolis home on Tuesday. "It's kind of a weird coincidence, but it's normal to me now," Gabe said about his injury. Both Gabe and his father have been campaigning for the last five years and believes it is "time for us to win something."

After an injury paralyzed his son, Matthew Rodreick has spent years advocating for funding to research spinal cord injuries.

Matthew Rodreick hasn’t cut or combed his hair in over six years.

After his son became paralyzed, Rodreick vowed not to maintain his hair until his son is out of his wheelchair. His long, gray dreadlocks now reach the lower part of his back.

The Red Ramp Project

Published: April 27, 2015

This video shows how basic access to a public space, can make a world of difference if you are physically-challenged.

What a Scuba Diver with a Spinal Cord Injury Has to Teach Us About...

Published: April 27, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Stan ClawsonStan Clawson loves to open the door for people. “They don’t expect it,” he says. Clawson, a filmmaker and communications professor based in Salt Lake City, is in his late 30s with sandy hair, blue eyes, and a handlebar mustache. He’s tall, “six-foot-four,” he says,  “you know… laying down. Upright? I’m not sure. Maybe four-foot-eight? Four-ten?”

Clawson has the deep, dynamic voice of a radio announcer and something of the devil in him. He’s been in a wheelchair since a rock climbing accident when he was 20 years old, when he fell 49 feet and severed his spinal cord between the T9 and T10 vertebrae. Since then, he’s learned to boogie board and downhill ski. He’s competed in marathons. And he’s earned advanced certifications as an open water diver.

Many gyms not fully accessible to people in wheelchairs

Published: April 23, 2015

(Reuters Health) – While some fitness centers may be accessible enough for wheelchairs to get through the door, most lack all of the accommodations necessary for people with limited mobility to use the gym, a small Mississippi study suggests.

All 10 gyms the researchers examined in Hattiesburg, Mississippi had elevators, and most had accessible parking and ramps, accommodations recommended by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). But none had equipment designed for use by people in wheelchairs or staff trained to help these individuals work out.

‘Exciting discovery’ could aid frontline spinal injury treatment

Published: April 22, 2015

Scientists a step closer to treating harmful inflammation after spinal cord injury

Rapid treatment with a new anti-inflammatory could have a major impact on recovery from spinal cord injury, University of Queensland researchers have found.

UQ School of Biomedical Sciences’ Dr Marc Ruitenberg and PhD student Ms Faith Brennan said they made the discovery during laboratory trials with an experimental drug.

Living with a spinal cord injury for 50 years and counting!

Published: April 21, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

IMG_0011.JPGI am a 50 year SCI ‘spinal cord injury’ survivor. I wrote this hoping it might encourage someone or help them get diagnosed.

Life is pretty much what we make of it, change is constant in a body and this world, but we can cope with those changes.

Stuff happens, we must cope with what comes our way. We just need a combination of faith, good doctors and medical technology, hard work and some luck.

Post-Traumatic Syringomyelia

Published: April 21, 2015

Syringomyelia is an uncommon but disabling complication of SCI. Although more than half of all people with SCI develop a cyst in the spinal cord at the injury site, only about 4% develop syringomyelia, in which the cyst fills with fluid and expands. This enlarged cyst, or syrinx, can damage the spinal cord and cause pain, loss of sensation, or weakness. Other symptoms may include low blood pressure with light-headedness, sweating, increased or decreased spasms, and impaired bladder emptying. In some cases, syringomyelia results in major loss of function.

New technology a ‘game-changer’ for quadriplegic cattleman

Published: April 20, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

quadriplegic cattleman Rob CookRenowned quadriplegic cattleman Rob Cook has moved 2,500 kilometres across the country to trial new cattle yard technology he says is changing his world.

The fourth-generation producer and Nuffield scholar moved from his family’s property Suplejack Downs Station in the Northern Territory, to Queensland’s Bundaberg region, 15 months ago.

He is testing new devices including a joystick that lets him operate cattle drafting gates from his wheelchair.

Quadriplegic Iowa hunter shoots with special rifle

Published: April 20, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

DES MOINES (KCCI/CNN) – A quadriplegic Iowa woman got a special opportunity to hunt turkey as part of the Wheelin’ Sportsmen Spring Turkey Hunt.

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