Tuesday, October 20, 2020

Monthly Archives: September 2020

Perspective on employment rates after spinal cord injury – 30 years after the ADA

Published: September 22, 2020

Experts detail new paradigms of vocational rehabilitation that are fostering measurable progress in employment outcomes for individuals with spinal cord injury

East Hanover, NJ. A team of experts in disability employment summarized advances in outcomes being achieved in individuals recovering from spinal cord injury. Their article, “30 Years after the Americans with Disabilities Act: Perspectives on employment for persons with spinal cord injury,”

Fun 4 the Disabled

Published: September 16, 2020

At Fun4theDisabled, we believe everyone deserves not only to be included, but celebrated. We create video media and content highlighting opportunities for people with disabilities in the community, connecting them with organizations, programs, and events designed to provide accessibility that is both inclusive and FUN!

Researchers discover new path to neuron regeneration after spinal cord injury

Published: September 16, 2020

Dynamic networks that specialize in the transmission of information generally consist of multiple components, including not only primary processors, like computers, for example, but also numerous support applications and services. The human nervous system is fundamentally very similar—neurons, like computers, process and transmit information, sending molecular signals through axons to other neurons, all of which are supported by non-neuronal components, including an array of cells known as glia.

A Primary Care Provider’s Guide to Autonomic Dysfunction Following Spinal Cord Injury

Published: September 15, 2020 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Spinal cord injury (SCI) disrupts the crucial “crosstalk” between the spinal autonomic nervous system and supraspinal control centers. Therefore, SCI may result not only in motor paralysis but also in potentially life-threatening impairments of many autonomic functions including, but not limited to, blood pressure regulation. Despite the detrimental consequences of autonomic dysregulation, management and recovery of autonomic functions after SCI is greatly underexplored. Although impaired autonomic function may impact several organ systems, this overview will focus primarily on disruptions of cardiovascular and thermoregulation and will offer suggestions for management of these secondary effects of SCI.

NervGen’s NVG-291 brings New Hope for People With Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: September 12, 2020

(NAPSI)—If you or someone you care about is ever among the approximately 17,700 Americans who each year, according to The Journal of American Medical Association, suffer a new spinal cord injury or the hundreds of thousands that continue to live with a spinal cord injury, you may be relieved to learn about recent research.

Pregnancy In Women With Spinal Cord Injuries: What To Know

Published: September 12, 2020

It is important to find a physician who understands your unique situation. Many women with SCI report this being the hardest part.

Planning to have children is an important decision that most women will make at some point in their lives. The decision is not always easy and it becomes increasingly difficult for a woman living with a disability. Fortunately, with increased awareness and support, all women can have the family they desire. Women living with spinal cord injuries (SCI) may have some unique challenges, but that does not mean that they cannot become pregnant and deliver naturally.

Craig H. Neilsen Foundation Visionary Prize: Each winner awarded $1 million

Published: September 10, 2020

The Craig H. Neilsen Foundation is thrilled to announce the creation of the Craig H. Neilsen Visionary Prize and the selection of Andrea Dalzell, Dr. Brian K. Kwon, and Reveca Torres as its inaugural recipients. Each prize winner is awarded $1 million, respectively.

Restless nature of human spinal cord, non-invasive imaging reveals

Published: September 10, 2020

EPFL scientists have developed a non-invasive technique for unraveling the complex dynamics generated by spinal cord circuits to unprecedented detail, a first in functional magnetic resonance imaging that may one day help diagnose spinal cord dysfunction or injury.

The spinal cord roughly looks like a long tube, with a diameter of only 1.5 cm, and yet this crucial part of the nervous system is essential for controlling how our arms and legs move, for giving us our sense of touch as well as a notion of where our bodies are in space.

This Australian-designed bionic glove will bring greater autonomy to paralysis patients

Published: September 9, 2020 | Spinal Cord Injury:

A new bionic glove being developed in Australia could see paralysis patients achieve greater autonomy.

The seeds of the KinoGlove project were sown 17 years ago, when biomedical engineer Puya Abolfathi began his PhD at the University of Sydney in 2003.

Differently abled, not disabled

Published: September 8, 2020

Better health, mobility for wheelchair-bound people wheelchair-users through sports

“Differently abled, not disabled” — this is how Noor Nahian, the founder of Bangladesh Wheelchair Sports Foundation captioned a photo of himself sitting in his wheelchair, that he posted on Twitter.