Tuesday, August 20, 2019

T-1

UofL research helps spinal cord injury patients take steps

Published: September 24, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , , ,

Two research participants living with traumatic, motor complete spinal cord injury are able to walk over ground thanks to epidural stimulation paired with daily locomotor training. In addition, these and two other participants achieved independent standing and trunk stability when using the stimulation and maintaining their mental focus.

The research, conducted at the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center at the University of Louisville, was published online early and will appear in the Sept. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

InVivo Therapeutics scaffold device may improve spinal cord injury — 4 key insights

Published: May 8, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

An investigational scaffold device from InVivo Therapeutics increases the likelihood that a patient with acute thoracic complete spinal cord injury will have a neurologic status ‘conversion’ from complete paraplegia to incomplete injury, according to findings presented at the American Association of Neurological Surgeons 2018 Annual Meeting in New Orleans and detailed in Medscape.

Here are four things to know.

Couple comes closer together by seeking paralysis cure and competing in New York City...

Published: November 5, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

This couple is in it for the long haul.

For Rob Summers, 31, and Julie Grauert, 34, the New York City Marathon was an opportunity to fund-raise for a cause near and dear to their hearts: Finding a cure for the six million Americans living with paralysis.

But as the first-time marathoners worked to get closer to a cure, they also got closer to each other.

Summers was a 20-year-old pitcher at Oregon State with dreams of playing in the Major Leagues when he was struck by a hit-and-run driver in July 2006.

Ekso GT™ Robotic Exoskeleton Cleared by FDA for Use With Stroke and Spinal Cord...

Published: April 4, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , , , ,

Ekso GT Robotic ExoskeletonFirst robotic exoskeleton cleared for use with stroke and spinal cord injury levels to C7

RICHMOND, Calif., April 04, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ekso Bionics Holdings, Inc. (OTCQB:EKSO), a robotic exoskeleton company, today announced that it has received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market its Ekso GT robotic exoskeleton for use in the treatment of individuals with hemiplegia due to stroke, individuals with spinal cord injuries at levels T4 to L5, and individuals with spinal cord injuries at levels of T3 to C7 (ASIA D), in accordance with device’s labeling. The Ekso GT is the first exoskeleton cleared by the FDA for use with stroke patients.

Neuralstem spinal cord injury stem cell trial approved to commence at University Of California

Published: April 18, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Neuralstem LogoNeuralstem, announced that the Institutional Review Board of the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine has approved the phase I safety trial to treat chronic spinal cord injury (cSCI) with its NSI-566 stem cells. The NSI-566/cSCI phase I trial will enroll patients with thoracic spinal cord injuries (T2-T12) who have an American Spinal Injury Association (AIS) A level of impairment, between one and two years after injury. AIS A impairment, which is complete paralysis, refers to a patient with no motor or sensory function in the relevant segments at and below the injury.

Walking with hope

Published: June 3, 2012 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Patients with spinal cord injuries are challenging mainstream treatments in their bid to recover use of their paralysed limbs. Quadriplegic Matthew Pierri reports.

IN THE early morning of June 17, 2007, I had a nightmare. I was strapped to a bed in a dark room, paralysed below my chest. I struggled in silence until a lady appeared. She sighed and told me to relax, asking me if I knew where I was; if I knew what had happened. I didn’t answer, I just tried to wake up.

You never forget the moment you realise you’re already awake.

Paraplegic Man Stands, Steps with Assistance, Moves His Legs Voluntarily

Published: May 24, 2011 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Regimen of Epidural Spinal Cord Stimulation, Plus Extensive Locomotor Training, A Significant Breakthrough

A team of scientists at the University of Louisville, UCLA and the California Institute of Technology has achieved a significant breakthrough in its initial work with a paralyzed male volunteer at Louisville’s Frazier Rehab Institute. It is the result of 30 years of research to find potential clinical therapies for paralysis.

Pharmacological Management of Hemodynamic Complications Following Spinal Cord Injury

Published: May 10, 2009 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

The damage from primary and secondary insults of spinal cord injury can result in various hemodynamic alterations. It is important to understand the presentation and time course of these changes, in addition to the management of each, to avoid further clinical deterioration and complications.

Traumatic spinal cord injury has an incidence of 10,000 cases per year with a prevalence of approximately 200,000 people in the United States.1 These numbers do not account for deaths in the field, which are estimated to occur in 16% to 30% of these cases. The patient demographics mirror that of the general trauma population with the average age around 30 years and a male predominance. Although motor vehicle collisions account for roughly half of all spinal cord injury cases, other events including assaults, falls, work-place injuries, and sporting accidents account for a large portion of the rest.2
Pathophysiology

Creative physical therapy improves lives of people with paralysis

Published: November 4, 2008 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

rehabEvery 41 minutes someone sustains a spinal cord injury. Almost half of these injuries are due to Motor vehicle crashes, followed by the next most common cause, falls. The majority of those affected are males between the ages of 16 and 30. One minute they’re leading active, independent lives and the next, they’re paralyzed, confined to a wheelchair and destined to a sedentary existence.

Such was the fate of Allan Northrup. Seven years ago, the Eastside man was in a car accident off of I-90 on Thanksgiving weekend. He sustained a C7-T1 spinal cord injury and ended up with a metal plate in his back to realign his spine. He spent two months in rehab and eventually learned how to transfer himself from his bed to his wheelchair.

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