Thursday, May 6, 2021

Tag: Autonomic Dysreflexia

Things you might not know about Autonomic Dysreflexia

The body is a series of checks and balances. This is true of muscles that push and countering muscles that pull. It is also true of the nervous system that operates in a balancing...

Autonomic Dysreflexia is a life threatening condition

Autonomic Dysreflexia is a life threatening condition that can cause death. The most common causes of Autonomic Dysreflexia are bladder and bowel distension. Signs and Symptoms: Raised BP, bradycardia, pounding headache, flushing, sweating or blotching above...

Autonomic hyperreflexia after spinal cord injury managed successfully with intravenous lidocaine: a case report

Abstract Background Some paraplegic patients may wish undergo some surgical procedures, like urological procedures, without anesthesia. However, these patients can develop autonomic hyperreflexia if cystoscopy is performed without anesthesia. Case presentation We present a case of severe autonomic...

Mister Rogers TV Hall of Fame (Special Appearance by Jeff Erlanger) (1999)

https://youtu.be/PI_9GegVoYk A quadriplegic from a young age following surgery for a spinal tumor, Mr. Erlanger appeared on the "Neighborhood" at age 10 (1981), but his relationship with Fred Rogers continued through the years. In 1999,...

Motivated by Personal Experience, Scientist Seeks Answers About Spinal Cord Injury

https://youtu.be/938-NOmZkso LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 15, 2016) — At the age of 19, Sasha Rabchevsky was a strong safety on the Hampden-Sydney College football team when a motorcycle accident left him paralyzed from the chest down. Rabchevsky...

Rio Paralympics: Kurt Fearnley predicts ‘boosting’ cheats will get caught

Australia's champion wheelchair racer Kurt Fearnley says from his first Paralympics, in Sydney 2000, he has heard stories about boosting – the practice among athletes with spinal cord injuries of inflicting trauma on themselves, such as breaking a toe or sitting on their scrotums, to raise their blood pressure and improve performance.

Spinal Cord Injuries Lead to a Very Odd (But Serious) Risk

People who get serious spinal cord injuries have to adjust to a lot. That may be why, in the first year after their injuries, they are at serious risk for a potentially fatal condition called autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia shows that the body can take itself down if its signals are ignored.

Autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord injury

Autonomic dysreflexia often goes unrecognised in patients with spinal cord injury. Health professionals must be able to recognise when patients are at risk. A young patient with tetraplegia arrives in the emergency department with a severe headache, dilated pupils, beads of sweat on their forehead, chest pain, bradycardia and a blood pressure of 280/130. What do you think is happening? Recreational drug use? A hypertensive crisis with a renal, endocrine or neurological cause? Is your immediate response to carry out an electrocardiogram and blood tests? In fact, this life-threatening emergency could be caused by something as simple as a full bladder.

SCI-U | Healthy living starts here

SCI-U is a series of 10 multimedia courses about learning to live with spinal cord injury. The courses have been designed to give you the information you need to live a healthy, active life. They were developed by people who live with SCI, in collaboration with researchers and clinicians.

What is Autonomic Dysreflexia?

Autonomic Dysreflexia Autonomic dysreflexia (AD) is a potentially life-threatening medical emergency that affects people with spinal cord injuries at the T6 level or higher. Although rare, some people with T7 and T8 injuries can develop...