Thursday, December 5, 2019

Tag: bladder control

Acupuncture Improves Spinal Cord Injury Bladder Function

Published: September 2, 2019

Acupuncture improves bladder function for spinal cord injury patients. First Affiliated Huai’an People’s Hospital of Nanjing Medical University researchers find acupuncture combined with intermittent catheterization alleviates neurogenic bladder dysfunction caused by traumatic spinal cord injuries . The study found significant improvements in bladder capacity, residual volume, urinary flow rate, urinary volume, and detrusor pressure following this combined treatment approach.

Living with a Spinal Cord Injury: Bladder Management

Published: May 1, 2019

A spinal cord injury can affect nearly every bodily function.

Urinary bacteria in spinal cord injury cases may tip balance toward UTIs

Published: January 17, 2019

The fallout from spinal cord injury doesn’t end with loss of mobility: Patients can have a range of other issues resulting from this complex problem, including loss of bladder control that can lead to urine retention. One of the most serious implications is urinary tract infections (UTIs), the most common cause of repeat hospitalization in people with spinal cord injuries, explains Hans G. Pohl, M.D., associate chief in the division of Urology at Children’s National Health System.

Diagnosing UTIs in people with spinal cord injuries is trickier than in people who are otherwise healthy, Dr. Pohl explains. Patients with spinal cord injuries nearly universally have bacteria present in their urine regardless of whether they have a UTI.

Neuroscientists restore significant bladder control to 5 men with spinal cord injuries

Published: August 22, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , ,

In UCLA study, magnetic stimulation of lower spine eliminates need for catheter for up to 4 weeks

More than 80 percent of the 250,000 Americans living with a spinal cord injury lose the ability to urinate voluntarily after their injury. According to a 2012 study, the desire to regain bladder control outranks even their wish to walk again.

In a study of five men whose injuries occurred five to 13 years ago, UCLA neuroscientists stimulated the lower spinal cord through the skin with a magnetic device placed at the lumbar spine.

UofL researchers report activity-based training improves urinary function after spinal cord injury

Published: February 1, 2018

Activity-based training has resulted in unexpected benefits for individuals with severe spinal cord injury. Researchers in the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center at the University of Louisville have discovered that the training, designed to help individuals with SCI improve motor function, also leads to improved bladder and bowel function and increased sexual desire.

Research participants receiving activity-based training conducted by KSCIRC at Frazier Rehab Institute initially reported improvements in bladder, bowel and sexual function anecdotally. Charles Hubscher, PhD, professor and researcher at KSCIRC, has documented those changes in research published today in the journal PLOS ONE.

The award-winning device that tells you when you need to pee

Published: December 4, 2017

When you need to go, you need to go – unless you’re the type of person who has a hard time telling. Jihee Junn talks to the team behind wearable bladder sensor Uri-Go, winner of Callaghan Innovation’s C-Prize for 2017.

Five and a half years ago, Mike Brown broke his back, leaving him paralysed from the waist down. He could no longer walk, but he soon realised that was just one of his worries. “A spinal cord injury means you can’t typically feel anything below your injury. So in my case, I can’t feel how full my bladder is and I can’t empty my bladder naturally.”

How Does Spinal Cord Injury Effect the Bladder?

Published: December 14, 2016

Dr. Sean Elliot, MD, MS Professor and Vice Chair of Urology University of Minnesota explains how spinal cord injury effects the bladder.

Paralysed Irishman’s inspiring invention will help others living with spinal cord injuries

Published: July 12, 2016

Sean DohertyA MEDICAL engineer from Gloucestershire who was paralysed as a teenager is hoping his pioneering invention will help improve the quality of life for thousands of others like him.

Sean Doherty was just 18 when he broke his neck in a mountain bike accident.

Since then he has lived with Tetraplegia, which means he is disabled and has limited hand and arm function.

The former University of Cardiff student, whose parents are from Belfast and Tipperary, is currently based in London working at the London Spinal Cord Injury Centre at the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital in Stanmore.

United Spinal Association Recruiting People with Spinal Cord Injury and Disease for a Study...

Published: March 17, 2016

United-Spinal-AssociationNEW YORK, March 17, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — United Spinal Association is working with MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital and Children’s National Medical Center to learn more about the experiences of people who use intermittent catheterization and who experience urinary symptoms frequently.

The research team at MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital, located in Washington, DC (*participants can be located anywhere in the USA), noticed during a past study that people with bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury or disease (SCI/D) had much less Lactobacillus (a ‘healthy’ bacteria) in their urine, compared with those who didn’t have SCI/D.

Biorobotic bladders: breakthrough treatment for spinal injury

Published: February 26, 2016

lawn-wheelchair“Research in this field is progressing but, predictably, has a long way to go”

Believe it or not, we are electrical creatures. Each and every living cell in your body is electrically active. The sodium-potassium pump, which you may remember from secondary school biology, pumps sodium ions out of the cell and potassium ions in, creating a difference in charge across the cell membrane. Neurons exploit these differences in charge and ion concentrations to rapidly carry signals down the length of their cell bodies and trigger the release of chemical messengers.

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