Wednesday, June 3, 2020

Tag: Boston University

Travis Roy to Receive Honorary Degree

Published: May 10, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Former Terrier hockey player now major supporter of spinal cord research

In the video above, Travis Roy reflects on his life 20 years after a paralyzing injury and talks about what he sees for his future. Photo by Jackie Riccardi

Discovery in roundworms may one day help humans with spinal cord injury and paralysis

Published: April 11, 2016

roundworms may help paralysisA newly discovered pathway leading to the regeneration of central nervous system (CNS) brain cells (neurons) in a type of roundworm (C. elegans) sheds light on the adult human nervous system’s ability to regenerate.

The findings, which appear online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, soon may lead to treatments that enhance nerve cell regeneration in humans with spinal cord injury and paralysis.

20 Years Later: Travis Roy Reflects On Life-Altering Injury, Foundation

Published: June 18, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

travis-royBOSTON (CBS) — It’s been 20 years since Travis Roy’s hockey career came to an end, just 11 seconds after it began.

A freshman at Boston University, Roy took the ice as a Terrier for the first time on October 20, 1995 — the same night the team raised their 1994 National Championship banner. Roy was hoping to be a big part in raising a few more banners over his four-year career, but those dreams came to a halt shortly after he climbed over the boards and hit the ice for his first shift as a collegiate athlete.

Testing Micro-Electronic Stimulators for Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: October 18, 2011

A new wireless device to help victims of spinal cord injury is receiving attention in the research community. Mesut Sahin, PhD, associate professor, in the department of biomedical engineering at NJIT, recently has published and presented news of his findings to develop micro-electrical stimulators for individuals with spinal cord injuries.

The work, now in its third year of support from a four-year, $1.4 million National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant, has resulted in the development and testing of a technology known by its acronym, FLAMES (floating light activated micro-electrical stimulators). The technology, really a tiny semiconductor device, will eventually enable people with spinal cord injuries to restore some of the motor functions that are lost due to injury.

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