Sunday, July 5, 2020

Tag: Catheters

Researchers Develop New Coating To Reduce Pain And Risk Of Infection For Catheter Users

Published: March 5, 2020
Queen’s University Belfast

Researchers from the School of Pharmacy at Queen’s have developed a new antimicrobial coating which can be applied to urinary catheters and other medical devices to significantly reduce pain and lower the risk of infection.

The unique coating has the potential to greatly improve the quality of life for the millions of catheter users worldwide.

Living with a Spinal Cord Injury: Bladder Management

Published: May 1, 2019

A spinal cord injury can affect nearly every bodily function.

Neuroscientists restore significant bladder control to 5 men with spinal cord injuries

Published: August 22, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , ,

In UCLA study, magnetic stimulation of lower spine eliminates need for catheter for up to 4 weeks

More than 80 percent of the 250,000 Americans living with a spinal cord injury lose the ability to urinate voluntarily after their injury. According to a 2012 study, the desire to regain bladder control outranks even their wish to walk again.

In a study of five men whose injuries occurred five to 13 years ago, UCLA neuroscientists stimulated the lower spinal cord through the skin with a magnetic device placed at the lumbar spine.

New Health Videos Featured on the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation YouTube Channel

Published: June 27, 2018

Christopher & Dana Reeve FoundationSHORT HILLS, N.J., June 27, 2018 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life for people living with paralysis, has created four new videos that feature informative information on different aspects of health and real-life situations while living with paralysis. The videos can be found on the Foundation’s YouTube channel, which also features personal stories, wheelchair reviews, new technology available, and many more.

The newest videos include:

Doctor re-examines evidence on UTIs in patients with spinal cord injury

Published: December 13, 2017

People with spinal cord injuries rely on catheters to empty their bladder. When a well-respected publication concluded that catheters could be reused without an increased risk of infection, it didn’t sit right with a Vancouver clinician and researcher. He had spoken to wheelchair athletes about this very issue while working at the Summer Paralympics in London.

“Wheelchair athletes from wealthier countries would only use each catheter once while athletes from developing countries would clean and reuse their catheters again and again,” said Dr. Andrei Krassioukov, a professor of medicine at UBC and chair in rehabilitation research with ICORD. “The athletes who used catheters only once experienced three-to-four times fewer urinary tract infections than athletes who reused catheters.”

The award-winning device that tells you when you need to pee

Published: December 4, 2017

When you need to go, you need to go – unless you’re the type of person who has a hard time telling. Jihee Junn talks to the team behind wearable bladder sensor Uri-Go, winner of Callaghan Innovation’s C-Prize for 2017.

Five and a half years ago, Mike Brown broke his back, leaving him paralysed from the waist down. He could no longer walk, but he soon realised that was just one of his worries. “A spinal cord injury means you can’t typically feel anything below your injury. So in my case, I can’t feel how full my bladder is and I can’t empty my bladder naturally.”

What is a spinal cord injury?

Published: May 28, 2017

A spinal cord injury means that the spinal cord of a person is damaged and the person cannot do things that they otherwise would have been able to do such as walking (mobility) or feeling in certain parts of their body.

The spinal cord of a person is roughly 50 centimetres in length and it spreads from the bottom of the brain to about the waist. It is a key bundle of nerves that facilitates communication between the brain and the rest of the body, giving instructions to initiate actions such as movement.  It consists of 31 pairs of nerves which connect it to different parts of the body, with the nerves that are on the left connecting with the left side of the body and those that are on the right connecting with the right side of the body (WHO, 2010).

User-Friendly Urinary Catheter Designed by Quadriplegic Gets FDA Clearance

Published: October 6, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

perfic-cath-catheter-designed-by-quadriplegicAdapta Medical, Inc. to Expand Catheter Product Line

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo., Oct. 6, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — Adapta Medical, Inc. has received FDA market release for the PerfIC Cath® intermittent touchless urinary catheter. The sterile catheter system was designed by J. Glen House, MD, a C7 quadriplegic with limited finger dexterity.

FDA clearance for the PerfIC Cath® will result in Adapta expanding the PerfIC Cath® product line and launching the new mPower Cath™ series catheter product line. Both product lines feature hydrophilic and gel lubricants for straight and coude-tipped catheters. The PerfIC Cath® catheters have an attached urine collection bag while the mPower Cath™ products have a urine collection bag that is not attached to the catheter.

The Connected Catheter by Spinal Singularity

Published: September 21, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Derek HerreraThe world’s first semi-permanent, minimally invasive, smart catheter system for Neurogenic Bladder.

After Derek Herrera was paralyzed by a sniper in Afghanistan, he decided to start a company to improve quality of life for people living with paralysis.

I knew my life would change, but I didn’t know that managing my bladder would be the most challenging task I faced on a daily basis. As a individual living each day with paralysis resulting from spinal cord injury, I understand just how terrible the current standard of care can be for managing Neurogenic Bladder.

Bladder Programs After a Spinal Cord Injury

Published: September 21, 2014

Bladder-Programs-After-a-Spinal-Cord-Injury-1030x356Nerve damage to the bladder is a common side effects of having a spinal cord injury, other injury, surgical procedures, and several disease processes. Having a consistent bladder program reduces accidents, infections, and the risk of autonomic hyperreflexia.

Neurogenic Bladder

A neurogenic bladder is one that takes voluntarily control of holding or emptying urine away from the person. Some people are unable to store urine (reflex/spastic) and this causes loss over control over emptying and leads to accidents. More commonly with a neurogenic bladder patients are unable to empty the bladder (flaccid) or pass urine at all without using a catheter. There are several types of catheters available and your doctor will help you choose which system is right for you.