Thursday, December 5, 2019

Tag: deep-brain stimulation

Researchers test noninvasive brain stimulation for motor recovery after spinal cord injury

Published: August 26, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

With funding from the Department of Defense, research facilities in Ohio and New Jersey will conduct a multi-site study of transcranial stimulation for recovery of upper limb function in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury

East Hanover, NJ. August 26, 2019. Kessler Foundation is one of three sites participating in a study of noninvasive brain stimulation to improve upper limb function

Brain-controlled, non-invasive muscle stimulation allows chronic paraplegics to walk

Published: May 15, 2019

In another major clinical breakthrough of the Walk Again Project, a nonprofit international consortium aimed at developing new neurorehabilitation protocols, technologies, and therapies for spinal cord injury, two patients with paraplegia regained the ability to walk with minimal assistance, via a fully non-invasive brain-machine interface that does not require the use of any invasive spinal cord surgical procedure. The results of this study appeared in the May 1 issue of Scientific Reports.

SDSU’s Brain Chip Could Eliminate Spinal Cord Injury Paralysis

Published: October 26, 2015

SDSU’s Brain Chip Could Eliminate Spinal Cord Injury ParalysisResearchers at San Diego State University and two other schools won a $15 million grant to continue their work on a brain chip that could help people with traumatic spinal cord injuries undo the effects of paralysis, it was announced Monday.

The work done by the SDSU researchers — along with teams at the University of Washington and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology — for the Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering is aimed at helping paralyzed people regain mobility.

A pacemaker in the brain for spinal cord injury?

Published: October 24, 2013

2007 Regenerative MedicineDeep-brain stimulation, a technique used for more than a decade to manage the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, may help restore greater function and more natural movement to patients with spinal cord injuries that have left at least a few nerves intact, new research says.

A study published this week in the journal Science Translational Medicine showed that in rats whose spinal cords were partially severed, the implantation of a pacemaker in the brain’s mesencephalic locomotor region – a control center for the initiation of movement – restored the hind limbs’ ability to run and support weight to near-normal levels.

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