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Articles Tagged: FES

Dr. Monica Perez’s Team Shows First Evidence of Using Cortical Targets to Improve Motor Function

Published: June 13, 2017 | Category: News

Monica A. Perez, P.T., Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Neurological Surgery and The Miami Project, and colleagues, recently published A novel cortical target to enhance hand motor output in humans with spinal cord injury in the June issue of Brain that provides the first evidence that cortical targets could represent a novel therapeutic site for improving motor function in humans paralyzed by spinal cord injury (SCI).

A main goal of rehabilitation strategies in humans with SCI is to strengthen transmission in spared neural networks. Although neuromodulatory strategies have targeted different sites within the central nervous system to restore motor function following SCI, the role of cortical targets remains poorly understood. Continue Reading »

REACT: Spinal Cord Injury Recovery

Published: April 9, 2017 | Category: Links

REACT’s Neuro-Restorative program is for those seeking a comprehensive recovery through customized, one-on-one neuromuscular training.


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Brain-computer interface advance allows fast, accurate typing by people with paralysis

Published: February 21, 2017 | Category: News

In a Stanford-led research report, three participants with movement impairment controlled an onscreen cursor simply by imagining their own hand movements.

A clinical research publication led by Stanford University investigators has demonstrated that a brain-to-computer hookup can enable people with paralysis to type via direct brain control at the highest speeds and accuracy levels reported to date. Continue Reading »

Big Improvements to Brain-Computer Interface

Published: February 15, 2017 | Category: News

Newly developed “glassy carbon” electrodes transmit more robust signals to restore motion in people with damaged spinal cords.

When people suffer spinal cord injuries and lose mobility in their limbs, it’s a neural signal processing problem. The brain can still send clear electrical impulses and the limbs can still receive them, but the signal gets lost in the damaged spinal cord. Continue Reading »

UCLA researcher tackles paralysis with electrical stimulation devices

Published: February 10, 2017 | Category: News

A UCLA professor is helping paralyzed individuals regain use of their limbs through electric stimulation of the spinal cord.

In 2015, Reggie Edgerton, the director of the Neuromuscular Research Laboratory at UCLA, developed a robotic exoskeleton that helped a paralyzed man walk. Though the man is still paralyzed and cannot control the exoskeleton’s movement, Edgerton’s lab plans to do more research to make that happen. Continue Reading »

Spinal cord injury patients may benefit from using exoskeleton earlier in treatment

Published: August 3, 2016 | Category: News

exoskeleton-studyCumming School study first in Canada to examine whether using robotic device immediately following injuries promotes recovery

Researchers from the University of Calgary’s Cumming School of Medicine are the first in Canada to examine the benefits of using an exoskeleton robotic device to rehabilitate patients with spinal cord injuries (SCI) in the days and weeks following their injury. Continue Reading »

TrainFES.com

Published: July 19, 2016 | Category: Links

trainfes-comMedical Devices for REHABILITATION

Affordable, efficient, user friendly and a plug&play complete solution for patients with paralysis.

Technology that is changing the way patients see life.

REHABILITATION FOR DIFFERENT CAUSES OF PARALYSIS

“Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is an accepted treatment method for paresis or paralysis after spinal cord and head injury as well as stroke and other neurological motor neuron disorders.”

Measuring severity of spinal cord injuries

Published: March 22, 2016 | Category: Information

spinal cord injuryInjuries to the spinal cord partially or completely disrupt the neural pathways between the brain and the limbs. The consequences for the representation of the affected limbs in the brain can be drastic. Researchers have now measured how severely this representation is affected.

A strange sensation, but familiar to anyone who has ever been given local anaesthesia and watched while a doctor operated on their leg or arm: in that moment, your own body part seems foreign, as if it doesn’t belong to your body. One reason for this is that the brain still knows which position the limb occupied before the local anaesthetic took effect. As soon as it wears off, the spooky sensation disappears. Continue Reading »

Bioelectronic devices to improve quality of life after SCI

Published: March 3, 2016 | Category: Information

Bioelectronic devices that record and stimulate the brain, spinal cord or peripheral nerves have potential to dramatically improve function after injury or disease. Continue Reading »

Biorobotic bladders: breakthrough treatment for spinal injury

Published: February 26, 2016 | Category: News

lawn-wheelchair“Research in this field is progressing but, predictably, has a long way to go”

Believe it or not, we are electrical creatures. Each and every living cell in your body is electrically active. The sodium-potassium pump, which you may remember from secondary school biology, pumps sodium ions out of the cell and potassium ions in, creating a difference in charge across the cell membrane. Neurons exploit these differences in charge and ion concentrations to rapidly carry signals down the length of their cell bodies and trigger the release of chemical messengers. Continue Reading »