Monday, September 21, 2020

Tag: Functional Electrical Stimulation

Clinical trial starting in Cleveland to help patients with paralysis regain movement

Published: January 20, 2020 | Spinal Cord Injury:

CLEVELAND — A groundbreaking clinical trial is starting in Cleveland soon, and researchers are currently looking for participants.

Micro implants could restore standing and walking

Published: December 2, 2019

U of A research has a proven concept to restore spinal function.

U of A research has a proven concept to restore spinal function.
When Vivian Mushahwar first applied to grad school, she wrote about her idea to fix paralysis by rewiring the spinal cord.

Over-the-skin electrical stimulation helps provide movement in quadriplegics

Published: November 7, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Feinstein Institutes research examines new closed-loop neurostimulation

MANHASSET, NY — Researchers at The Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research used new closed-loop neurostimulation methods and textile-based electrodes to facilitate individual finger movement and grasp force regulation in quadriplegia individuals. Their results were published in the Springer Nature journal, Bioelectronic Medicine.

Cleveland researchers develop technology to give spinal cord injury patients use of hands back

Published: October 4, 2019

CLEVELAND — Ground-breaking, life-changing research is happening at MetroHealth Medical Center when it comes to spinal cord injuries and giving people function back.

Spinal cord injury Veterans can now effectively cough

Published: August 2, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Researchers restore complete respiratory muscle function

VA doctors are among a team of researchers at the Cleveland Functional Electrical Stimulation Center restoring respiratory muscle function to Veterans and individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI).

Doctors Anthony DiMarco and Krzysztof Kowalski developed the first method in the world that can activate expiratory muscles (abdominal and lower rib cage muscles), using minimally invasive techniques to produce an effective cough.

How a revolutionary technique got people with spinal-cord injuries back on their feet

Published: July 31, 2019

Electrical stimulation has promised huge gains for people with paralysis. Now comes the hard part — getting beyond those first steps.

Rob Summers was flat on his back at a rehabilitation institute in Kentucky when he realized he could wiggle his big toe. Up, down, up, down. This was new — something he hadn’t been able to do since a hit-and-run driver left him paralysed from the chest down. When that happened four years earlier, doctors had told him that he would never move his lower body again. Now he was part of a pioneering experiment to test the power of electrical stimulation in people with spinal-cord injuries.

Brain-controlled, non-invasive muscle stimulation allows chronic paraplegics to walk

Published: May 15, 2019

In another major clinical breakthrough of the Walk Again Project, a nonprofit international consortium aimed at developing new neurorehabilitation protocols, technologies, and therapies for spinal cord injury, two patients with paraplegia regained the ability to walk with minimal assistance, via a fully non-invasive brain-machine interface that does not require the use of any invasive spinal cord surgical procedure. The results of this study appeared in the May 1 issue of Scientific Reports.

Transforming Thoughts to Movement Offers New Hope for Spinal Cord Injury Patients

Published: March 28, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

What if paralyzed limbs could move using only the power of one’s thoughts? Borrowing a story line from the realm of science fiction, a team of researchers at The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis—together with neurosurgeons and biomedical engineers from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine—are using a brain-machine interface to make this once seemingly impossible feat a reality for victims of spinal cord injury (SCI). Seeking innovative ways to restore function after SCI is one of the central goals for The Miami Project, which was founded in 1985 and has grown to become one of the “crown jewels” of the Miller School of Medicine—and a model for other institutions developing centers for SCI research.

Electrical stimulation technique helps patients with spinal cord injury

Published: February 19, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

For many individuals with spinal cord injury, restoring autonomic functions – such as blood pressure control, bowel, bladder and sexual function – is of a higher priority than walking again.

Paralysis (loss of muscle function) is the most visible consequence of a spinal cord injury. Historically, there have been few significant advances in the treatment of such paralysis in individuals with long-term injuries.

Department of Defense Awards $2.5M for Improving Spinal Cord Injury in Rehabilitation

Published: May 7, 2018

In the United States, more than 280,000 people—including 42,000 military veterans—are affected by spinal cord injury (SCI), including limb weakness and paralysis. While rehabilitation can be helpful, the benefits are slow and inadequate to restore patients’ lost independence. A team of researchers at Cleveland Clinic is trying to speed recovery using noninvasive brain stimulation.

Ela B. Plow, PhD, PT, of Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute, recently received a four-year, $2.5 M award from the Department of Defense (DoD) to lead a brain stimulation study in patients with paralyzed upper limbs due to SCI. The award was granted under the DoD’s Spinal Cord Injury Research Program.