Friday, November 15, 2019

Tag: Medical Technology

Intel, Brown University collaborate on “intelligent spine technology”

Published: October 3, 2019

With $6.3 million in DARPA funding, Intel, Brown and other partners will work on building the AI-driven hardware and software needed to treat spinal cord injuries.

When someone suffers a severe spinal injury, their brain’s electrical signals can get cut off from their muscles, leading to paralysis. It’s a devastating problem, especially since the human body cannot regenerate severed nerve fibers. But with the help of the right AI-driven technologies, medical professionals may eventually be able to help spinal injury victims regain muscle control and sensation.

An ‘EpiPen’ for spinal cord injuries

Published: July 11, 2019

ANN ARBOR—An injection of nanoparticles can prevent the body’s immune system from overreacting to trauma, potentially preventing some spinal cord injuries from resulting in paralysis.

The approach was demonstrated in mice at the University of Michigan, with the nanoparticles enhancing healing by reprogramming the aggressive immune cells—call it an “EpiPen” for trauma to the central nervous system, which includes the brain and spinal cord.

Wearable sensor may cut costs and improve access to biofeedback for people with incomplete...

Published: February 20, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

A new electromyography biofeedback device that is wearable and connects to novel smartphone games may offer people with incomplete paraplegia a more affordable, self-controllable therapy to enhance their recovery, according to a new study presented this week at the Association of Academic Physiatrists Annual Meeting in Puerto Rico.

Electromyography (recording electrical activity of muscles) biofeedback has been shown to enhance recovery of muscle control in people with incomplete spinal cord injury.

Bionic bodies: From typing with a glance to restoring paralyzed limbs, new technology aids...

Published: October 13, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

If eye-gaze technology, motion sensor tracking and functional electrical stimulation sound like secret weapons of the CIA, you’d be half right. Much of the newfangled equipment in use for those with medical disabilities came out of technology originally designed for the government. Now, it’s helping injured and ill people with life’s basic needs.

Former Saints player Steve Gleason, diagnosed with ALS in 2011, propels his custom wheelchair with only a glance.

“I have an infrared eye tracker that is connected to my laptop and serves as my control center,” said Gleason.

Man with quadriplegia employs injury bridging technologies to move again—just by thinking

Published: March 28, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

First recipient of implanted brain-recording and muscle-stimulating systems reanimates limb that had been stilled for eight years.

Big Improvements to Brain-Computer Interface

Published: February 15, 2017

Newly developed “glassy carbon” electrodes transmit more robust signals to restore motion in people with damaged spinal cords.

When people suffer spinal cord injuries and lose mobility in their limbs, it’s a neural signal processing problem. The brain can still send clear electrical impulses and the limbs can still receive them, but the signal gets lost in the damaged spinal cord.

Wearable walk-assist gets green light for sale in Japan

Published: November 26, 2015

Cyberdyne-HALTOKYO — Japan’s health ministry approved on Wednesday sale of a wearable walk-assist robot for use in medical facilities, underscoring the government’s push to promote such products as part of growth strategy.

The HAL for Medical Use, lower limb type, from startup Cyberdyne is the first wearable medical robot approved for sale in Japan.

The product is designed for use in healthcare facilities by patients with eight incurable conditions including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), muscular dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy, and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, given height and weight requirements.

The Latest Medical Breakthrough In Spinal Cord Injuries Was Made By A Computer Program

Published: October 14, 2015

spinal xrayNew software sifts through the information gathered in long forgotten studies and finds new avenues for researchers to pursue—like a new advance in treating spinal injuries.

Doctors have just discovered a previously unknown relationship between the long-term recovery of spinal cord injury victims and high blood pressure during their initial surgeries. This may seem like a small bit of medical news—though it will have immediate clinical implications—but what’s important is how it was discovered in the first place.

Paraplegic Man Races On Mechanical Legs

Published: September 19, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

paraplegic-man-races-on-mechanical-legsDenny Ross – paralyzed from the chest down in a car accident – has gone from counting his steps to counting kilometres, attempting to finish a five kilometre race with the use of a ReWalk exoskeleton on Saturday.

“It’s a huge step,” he said with a laugh while taking part in the N.E.R.D. Run at William Hawrelak Park, an annual fundraiser supporting the University of Alberta’s Neuroscience and Mental Health Institute.

Ross has been using the exoskeleton as part of a pilot study examining the effects of using the ReWalk device, purchased by the Spinal Cord Injury Treatment Society in 2014 and leased to the university for the trial.

Neurotechnology Provides Near-Natural Sense of Touch

Published: September 11, 2015

Neurotechnology Provides Near-Natural Sense of TouchRevolutionizing Prosthetics program achieves goal of restoring sensation

A 28-year-old who has been paralyzed for more than a decade as a result of a spinal cord injury has become the first person to be able to “feel” physical sensations through a prosthetic hand directly connected to his brain, and even identify which mechanical finger is being gently touched.

The advance, made possible by sophisticated neural technologies developed under DARPA’s Revolutionizing Prosthetics points to a future in which people living with paralyzed or missing limbs will not only be able to manipulate objects by sending signals from their brain to robotic devices, but also be able to sense precisely what those devices are touching.

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