Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Tag: Medical Technology

InVivo Therapeutics

Published: August 15, 2020

InVivo Therapeutics is a research and clinical-stage biomaterials and biotechnology company with a focus on treatment of spinal cord injuries.

By modulating the healing environment to facilitate cell survival and growth, we have the opportunity to change the treatment of spinal cord injury.

Paralyzed man has sense of touch restored by brain-machine interface

Published: July 29, 2020 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

This is the first BMI to restore movement and touch simultaneously

Ten years ago, while on vacation in North Carolina, Ian Burkhart broke his neck in a diving accident. The diagnosis was as life-changing as the injury: a complete spinal cord injury in the cervical spine. An injury of this nature often results in paraplegia. Burkhart might regain some movement and sensation in his shoulders and upper arm, doctors said. But the chances of ever moving his hands again were slim.

Quadriplegic doctor working on helping spinal patients walk again

Published: November 22, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

When it comes to developing cutting-edge technology to help people with spinal problems walk again, Dinesh Palipana is uniquely qualified – not only is he a decorated medical researcher, he’s also a quadriplegic.

Dr Palipana was seriously injured in a car crash on Brisbane’s Gateway Bridge in 2010 that robbed him of the use of his legs and left him with limited use of his arms.

Intel, Brown University collaborate on “intelligent spine technology”

Published: October 3, 2019

With $6.3 million in DARPA funding, Intel, Brown and other partners will work on building the AI-driven hardware and software needed to treat spinal cord injuries.

When someone suffers a severe spinal injury, their brain’s electrical signals can get cut off from their muscles, leading to paralysis. It’s a devastating problem, especially since the human body cannot regenerate severed nerve fibers. But with the help of the right AI-driven technologies, medical professionals may eventually be able to help spinal injury victims regain muscle control and sensation.

An ‘EpiPen’ for spinal cord injuries

Published: July 11, 2019

ANN ARBOR—An injection of nanoparticles can prevent the body’s immune system from overreacting to trauma, potentially preventing some spinal cord injuries from resulting in paralysis.

The approach was demonstrated in mice at the University of Michigan, with the nanoparticles enhancing healing by reprogramming the aggressive immune cells—call it an “EpiPen” for trauma to the central nervous system, which includes the brain and spinal cord.

Wearable sensor may cut costs and improve access to biofeedback for people with incomplete...

Published: February 20, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

A new electromyography biofeedback device that is wearable and connects to novel smartphone games may offer people with incomplete paraplegia a more affordable, self-controllable therapy to enhance their recovery, according to a new study presented this week at the Association of Academic Physiatrists Annual Meeting in Puerto Rico.

Electromyography (recording electrical activity of muscles) biofeedback has been shown to enhance recovery of muscle control in people with incomplete spinal cord injury.

Bionic bodies: From typing with a glance to restoring paralyzed limbs, new technology aids...

Published: October 13, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

If eye-gaze technology, motion sensor tracking and functional electrical stimulation sound like secret weapons of the CIA, you’d be half right. Much of the newfangled equipment in use for those with medical disabilities came out of technology originally designed for the government. Now, it’s helping injured and ill people with life’s basic needs.

Former Saints player Steve Gleason, diagnosed with ALS in 2011, propels his custom wheelchair with only a glance.

“I have an infrared eye tracker that is connected to my laptop and serves as my control center,” said Gleason.

Man with quadriplegia employs injury bridging technologies to move again—just by thinking

Published: March 28, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

First recipient of implanted brain-recording and muscle-stimulating systems reanimates limb that had been stilled for eight years.

Big Improvements to Brain-Computer Interface

Published: February 15, 2017

Newly developed “glassy carbon” electrodes transmit more robust signals to restore motion in people with damaged spinal cords.

When people suffer spinal cord injuries and lose mobility in their limbs, it’s a neural signal processing problem. The brain can still send clear electrical impulses and the limbs can still receive them, but the signal gets lost in the damaged spinal cord.

Wearable walk-assist gets green light for sale in Japan

Published: November 26, 2015

Cyberdyne-HALTOKYO — Japan’s health ministry approved on Wednesday sale of a wearable walk-assist robot for use in medical facilities, underscoring the government’s push to promote such products as part of growth strategy.

The HAL for Medical Use, lower limb type, from startup Cyberdyne is the first wearable medical robot approved for sale in Japan.

The product is designed for use in healthcare facilities by patients with eight incurable conditions including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), muscular dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy, and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, given height and weight requirements.