Friday, March 5, 2021

Tag: motor recovery

Dorsal root ganglion stimulation evokes motor responses in patients with complete spinal cord injury

Published: August 14, 2020 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Sadaf SoloukeyBilateral L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) stimulation has been shown to evoke strong and reproducible motor responses in the upper leg in patients with chronic motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI).

In their paper published in Neuromodulation, authors Sadaf Soloukey and colleagues from Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, refer to their study as the “first of its kind” to demonstrate the potential of the DRG as a new target for reproducible and potentially weight-bearing muscle recruitment in this particular cohort of patients.

Individual with complete spinal cord injury regains voluntary motor function

Published: October 26, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

A research participant at the University of Louisville with a complete spinal cord injury, who had lost motor function below the level of the injury, has regained the ability to move his legs voluntarily and stand six years after his injury.

A study published today in Scientific Reports describes the recovery of motor function in a research participant who previously had received long-term activity-based training along with spinal cord epidural stimulation (scES). In the article, senior author Susan Harkema, Ph.D., professor and associate director of the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center (KSCIRC) at the University of Louisville, and her colleagues report that over the course of 34.5 months following the original training, the participant recovered substantial voluntary lower-limb motor control and the ability to stand independently without the use of scES.

INSPIRE Laboratory

Published: July 12, 2016

inspire-lab-orgOur lab mission is to INSPIRE (integrate sensorimotor plasticity and interventions to promote recovery) persons with neurologic injury to regain function.

We are an interdisciplinary team of engineers, physiologists, neuroscientists, and clinicians that share a common mission: to study plasticity-inducing therapies directed at enhancing sensorimotor recovery in persons with catastrophic injury to their brain and/or spinal cord.

One Small Step

Published: January 25, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Darek FidykaA paraplegic undergoes pioneering surgery.

When a spinal cord is damaged, location is destiny: the higher the injury, the more severe the effects. The spine has thirty-three vertebrae, which are divided into five regions—the coccygeal, the sacral, the lumbar, the thoracic, and the cervical. The nerve-rich cord traverses nearly the entire length of the spine. The nerves at the bottom of the cord are well buried, and sometimes you can walk away from damage to these areas. In between are insults to the long middle region of the spine, which begins at the shoulders and ends at the midriff.

How humans, monkeys recover from paralysis

Published: August 29, 2015

How humans monkeys recover from paralysisLondon: Humans and monkeys exhibit greater motor recovery than rats after similar spinal cord injury, new research shows.Spontaneous improvement occurs during the first six months after a spinal cord injury, allowing a hemiplegic patient to recover partial motor control.

The neuronal mechanisms underlying this extensive recovery in primates are nearly absent in laboratory rats, researchers said. “Research on rats is essential for developing regenerative therapies, but rodents show fundamental differences from primates in terms of neuronal reorganisation and functional recovery,” say researchers.