Monday, December 9, 2019

Tag: neural stem cells

Spinal Neurons Grown From Stem Cells For First Time

Published: August 22, 2018

Modern medicine has still not managed to crack the problem of spinal cord injuries that result in significant paralysis or loss of functional status.

There are numerous factors that influence the inability to restore movement or autonomous bodily control to these patients. A prominent example of these is the inability to cultivate new neurons that make up and power the spinal cord.

However, some researchers have claimed that they have successfully induced ‘generic’ human stem cells to differentiate into stem cells that apply more specifically to the spine.

Created Line of Spinal Cord Neural Stem Cells Shows Diverse Promise

Published: August 6, 2018

Derived from human pluripotent stem cells, these diverse cells advance disease modeling and may provide new, scalable source of replacement cells for spinal cord injuries

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that they have successfully created spinal cord neural stem cells (NSCs) from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) that differentiate into a diverse population of cells capable of dispersing throughout the spinal cord and can be maintained for long periods of time.

Stem Cell-Based Phase I Trial to Repair Spinal Cord Injuries Produces Encouraging Results

Published: June 1, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , , , , , , , , ,

First-in-human clinical study found improved motor and sensory function in three of four participants

Writing in the June 1 issue of Cell Stem Cell, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that a first-in-human phase I clinical trial in which neural stem cells were transplanted into participants with chronic spinal cord injuries produced measurable improvement in three of four subjects, with no serious adverse effects.

In a break with dogma, myelin boosts neuron growth in spinal cord injuries

Published: May 23, 2018

The molecule inhibits adult axon regeneration, but appears to stimulate young neurons

Recovery after severe spinal cord injury is notoriously fraught, with permanent paralysis often the result. In recent years, researchers have increasingly turned to stem cell-based therapies as a potential method for repairing and replacing damaged nerve cells. They have struggled, however, to overcome numerous innate barriers, including myelin, a mixture of insulating proteins and lipids that helps speed impulses through adult nerve fibers but also inhibits neuronal growth.

Stem cell treatment could help paralyzed patients move

Published: January 15, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Louis TontodonatoLouis Tontodonato’s hopes and dreams may well lie in a virtual coin flip, a digital roll of the dice.

Paralyzed from the neck down, the 20-year-old Naples, Fla., man has enrolled in the first clinical trial testing the ability of stem cells to repair spinal cord injuries and restore sensation and movement in quadriplegics. Early studies in animals and humans have had remarkable results, enabling patients to resume everyday tasks they thought had been lost forever. If those early effects are validated, the treatment has the potential to drastically improve the quality of life and independence of thousands of spinal cord injury patients.

Could Spinal Cord Repairs in Mice Lead to a Cure for Paralysis in Humans?

Published: March 26, 2015

spinal-cord-injury-repair-miceSpinal cord injuries are extremely tragic, often leading to irreversible paralysis. Many groups around the world are pursuing various treatment options. Some of these attempt to transplant new neurons to repair the damage, use drugs to boost natural healing, or use electronic means to bridge the gap.

Currently it’s only in mice, but some researchers from China have produced extremely promising results using tissue engineering.

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