Saturday, March 6, 2021

Tag: Orthostatic Hypotension

Neuroprosthetic device maintains blood pressure after spinal cord injury

Published: January 27, 2021

replicating the baroreflexThe inability to maintain blood pressure is a debilitating consequence of spinal cord injury. This problem has now been circumvented, by artificially recreating a reflex essential for blood-pressure stability.

Paralysis and sensory deficits are the most obvious consequences of spinal cord injury (SCI). But many people also experience orthostatic hypotension — an inability to maintain blood pressure when moving from lying to sitting or standing. In the short term, the condition can prevent normal filling of the heart with blood, and can cause light-headedness and dizziness.

A Primary Care Provider’s Guide to Autonomic Dysfunction Following Spinal Cord Injury

Published: September 15, 2020 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Spinal cord injury (SCI) disrupts the crucial “crosstalk” between the spinal autonomic nervous system and supraspinal control centers. Therefore, SCI may result not only in motor paralysis but also in potentially life-threatening impairments of many autonomic functions including, but not limited to, blood pressure regulation. Despite the detrimental consequences of autonomic dysregulation, management and recovery of autonomic functions after SCI is greatly underexplored. Although impaired autonomic function may impact several organ systems, this overview will focus primarily on disruptions of cardiovascular and thermoregulation and will offer suggestions for management of these secondary effects of SCI.