Thursday, December 5, 2019

Tag: Recreation

Pain after Spinal Cord Injury

Published: November 13, 2003

This InfoSheet is based in large part on “Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury: Clinical Features, Prevalence, and Taxonomy”* by Philip J. Siddal, Robert P. Yezierski, and John D. Loeser and edited by Michael C. Rowbotham, MD and Annika Malmberg, PhD. It was published in the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) newsletter, Issue 3, 2000. www.halcyon.com/iasp. Updated: May 2001
What is Pain

Paid is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage. In general, people can experience acute and chronic pain.

Understanding the Importance of Language

Published: November 13, 2003

Every day more than thirty people become paralyzed from spinal cord injury (SCI) or disease. SCI generally results in one of two types of paralysis:

1. Paraplegia ­ paralysis affecting the legs and lower part of the body;
2. Tetraplegia ­ paralysis affecting the level below the neck and chest area, involving both the arms and legs.

The majority of people with SCI use wheelchairs for mobility, thus, they encounter many obstacles and barriers in everyday life. Among the most difficult barriers are those involving the public’s misperceptions and attitudes.

Adjustment After SCI: Facts Vs. Myths

Published: October 3, 2003

No one is happy about sustaining a spinal cord injury, and few who have experienced it will tell you it wasn’t a traumatic event in their lives. But doctors and medical staff are going too far when they expect every newly injured patient to become depressed, or to progress through specific stages of grief similar to those described by Elizabeth Kübler-Ross, MD, in her famous book, “On Death and Dying” (MacMillan, 1969).

When SCI Isn’t an Accident

Published: October 3, 2003 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

It’s 2:00 A.M. on a Saturday morning when police spot the limp body of a man lying in a park in downtown Seattle. Initially they assume he is a street person “sleeping one off”, but further investigation reveals that he has been assaulted and cannot move. Emergency units are called and he is rushed to the nearest trauma unit.

After extensive examination, it is found that the man has been struck with a blunt object and has sustained a high-level spinal cord injury that will leave him paralyzed from the neck down.

What You Should Know About Trampolines

Published: September 15, 2003

Using a trampoline is promoted as fun. But the growing popularity of trampolines among 8-year-olds to adults is resulting in a dramatic increase in serious injuries – including broken necks, spinal cord injuries, and disabling head traumas, many of which result in permanent paralysis as well as death. In addition, trampolines are responsible for many less serious injuries such as broken bones, including legs, arms, and other parts of the body, as well as different types of dislocations and muscle damage.

Other Resource Sites

Published: September 8, 2003

ADA – Americans with Disabilities Act
U.S. Department of Justice ADA home page.

ADA Technical Assistance Program
Consisted of a diverse array of projects to further the understanding and implementation of the Act. The program has created a vast infrastructure of resources, including numerous ADA publications and videos, materials targeted to specific audiences, training packages and an unparalleled knowledge of the ADA.

Online Magazines

Published: September 8, 2003

EnabledOnline
An online magazine and community that offers to people with disabilities, their families and caregivers a place to connect and share experiences.

Mainstream
Small online commentary produced by, for and about people with disabilities. Covers news & current affairs, new products & technology, education, employm

Spinal Cord: Heal Thyself

Published: August 29, 2002

Transplanted stem cells can improve Motor skills in injured rats

FRIDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDayNews) — Japanese researchers are reporting yet another advance in the repair of damaged body parts using fetal stem cells.

This one could be big because it involves spinal cords, experts say.

Life Satisfaction Among Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: July 12, 2000

Every year, approximately 10,000 persons in the United States, typically young adults (New Mobility, 1996), seriously injure their spinal cords and become permanently paralyzed. Through advances in medical treatment, most persons survive a spinal cord injury and live two or more decades post-injury. However, researchers have only recently begun to study the long-term psychosocial implications of a spinal cord injury (Whiteneck, Charlifue, Frankel, et al., 1992). One such psychosocial implication is the person’s perceived satisfaction with the quality of his or her life following such an injury. This study examined factors associated with the life satisfaction of persons with a spinal cord injury including biological, personal, and social factors.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!