Monday, September 21, 2020

Tag: Spinal Cord Injury Research

NervGen’s NVG-291 brings New Hope for People With Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: September 12, 2020

(NAPSI)—If you or someone you care about is ever among the approximately 17,700 Americans who each year, according to The Journal of American Medical Association, suffer a new spinal cord injury or the hundreds of thousands that continue to live with a spinal cord injury, you may be relieved to learn about recent research.

Re-engineered enzyme could help reverse damage from spinal cord injury and stroke

Published: August 24, 2020

A team of researchers from University of Toronto Engineering and the University of Michigan has redesigned and enhanced a natural enzyme that shows promise in promoting the regrowth of nerve tissue following injury.

Their new version is more stable than the protein that occurs in nature, and could lead to new treatments for reversing nerve damage caused by traumatic injury or stroke.

Biologist awarded $1.8M to study neuronal reprograming for spinal cord repair

Published: August 24, 2020

National Institutes of Health grant will enable Hedong Li to focus on role of micorRNAs in the reprogramming process

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Hedong Li, associate research professor of biology, has been awarded $1.8 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study how microRNAs — small segments of genetic material — could be used in treatments for spinal cord injury. The five-year grant builds upon previous work by Li and colleagues to convert glial cells, support cells that surround neurons, into functioning neurons.

SciTrialsFinder.net

Published: June 17, 2020
www.scitrialsfinder.net

The trials presented on this website are a subset of those on ClinicalTrials.gov that are for spinal cord injuries and have had features added to them by our expert curators.

Spinal cord injuries: Scientists probe individual cells to find better treatments

Published: May 1, 2020

Two top scientists at the University of Virginia School of Medicine are seeking answers to questions about spinal cord injuries that have long frustrated the development of effective treatments.

The scientists, Jonathan Kipnis, PhD, and Kodi Ravichandran, PhD, are teaming up to understand why critical nerve cells called neurons continue to die after spinal cord injuries. So little is known that doctors aren’t even certain if the body’s immune response is beneficial or harmful.

Scientists find a new way to regrow nerves in spinal injuries

Published: March 12, 2020

In experiments on rats with spinal cord injuries, the rodents improved their walking ability following treatment.

Researchers have demonstrated a novel method that might regrow nerve cells at the site of spinal injuries.

Research Identifies a Protein for Tissue Repair After the Spinal Cord Injury

Published: March 4, 2020

Recently researchers discovered an axon guidance protein known as Plexin B2 in the central nervous system (CNS). During the spinal cord injury, this protein plays a significant role in the healing of the wound and neural repair.

The experiment was designed and conducted by the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. This study could help the development of the treatments or therapies which target axon guidance pathways for treating the patients of Spinal cord injury more effectively.

6 key developments in spinal cord injury research

Published: February 14, 2020

Here are six key updates in the treatment of spinal cord injuries in the past six months:

The Tim and Caroline Reynolds Center for Spinal Stimulation at Kessler Foundation opened in East Hanover, N.J., in January. The facility has more than 50 researchers focusing on spinal stimulation research and restoring function in people with paralysis. Gail Forrest, PhD, who specializes in applying electrical stimulation to spinal cord injury research, was appointed director of the center.

Can an Active Lifestyle Improve Recovery After a Spinal Cord Injury?

Published: January 23, 2020

Permanent neurological impairments can occur after spinal cord injury (SCI) due to the failure of the spinal cord motor and sensory axons to regenerate.

This is because the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), unlike in some amphibians and reptiles, has inhibitory molecules blocking growth post-development, as well as the lack of an effective regenerative response system. Within the peripheral nervous system (PNS), there is some limited axonal recovery that can occur naturally.

Restoring arm, hand function after spinal cord injury focus of clinical trial

Published: December 12, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Spinal cord injuries caused by accidents, violence and disease paralyze from the neck down more than 5,000 people every year. In the first few months after injury, some people regain some movement and sensation in their limbs. Those who do not show improvement in the first few months are unlikely to ever recover.